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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
J. G.) Thompson and Douglass greeted him on October 10 in Liverpool, and took him directly to Wrexham, in Wales, Lib. 17.11. to meet an engagement at the Town Hall, which was packed till midnight. At the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, on October 12, a glorious gathering of four thousand people next awaited him. A short respite permitted him to visit Elizabeth Pease in Darlington, Oct. 14, 1846. and gratified him with the personal assurance of her improving health. At Newcastle, on October 16, the Lib. 16.187. Mayor presided at a meeting which effaced the impression made at Paisley, and this was succeeded by a public Ante, p. 175. breakfast. Liverpool was again reached (by way of Darlington), and, with no thanks to the philanthropists Lib. 16.187; Ms. Oct. 24, 1846, W. L. G. to R. D. Webb. of the great port, a meeting at Concert Hall went off famously, with Thompson in the chair as President of the League. Scotland was again royally scoured, in parts already gone over (w
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
least this selfish love of freedom could not be predicated. The freemen's spirit which had welcomed Thompson and the American Anti-Slavery Society, in confirmation of the local defiance of the Fugitive Slave Law, wrested, on October 1, 1851, the slave Jerry Lib.21.162,166. by force from the clutches of the police, and rebuked the dishonoring prophecy of the apostate Webster. Ante, P. 331 Samuel J. May to Miss Charlotte G. Coffin. A sister of Mrs. May. Syracuse, Oct. 15, 1851 [Oct. 16]. Ms. I am too busy to write you a long letter, but I must write a few lines to relieve your anxiety to know what is the present aspect of our controversy with the Government. After a fortnight's diligent search after materials to make out a case of constructive treason against Gerrit Smith, Charles A. Wheaton, Samuel J. May, and five others, and to find grounds for the indictment of sixteen for aiding and abetting the rescue of poor Jerry, we were informed last evening that the Dist
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
, by the Detroit papers (especially the Free Soil organ), were abusive, untruthful, and scurrilous, to the last degree. Everywhere the press in this country is as foul as the gutter, and as unprincipled as the father of lies. Most of the proprietors and editors more richly deserve a place in the penitentiary than many of its inmates; for they sin as with a cartrope, and on the largest and most comprehensive scale. It is a terrible sign of general corruption. To pass the time, on Sunday, October 16, Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 17, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G. crossed the Detroit River, and first set foot on Canadian soil at Windsor—a fit place, as it was largely populated by fugitives from the United States. He walked also to the neighboring Sandwich, likewise a place of refuge from American tyranny, and saw the barracks (formerly occupied by British soldiers) which, winter before last, were opened to shelter the crowd of fugitive slaves then hastening to that spot, to prevent them fr