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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
husiastic, and has produced a great impression on the public mind. I am sorry to add, and you will be not less ashamed to hear, that the two Irish papers in Boston sneer at the Address, and Lib. 12.27, 29, 33. denounce it and the abolitionists in true pro-slavery style. I fear they will keep the great mass of your countrymen here Lib. 13.19, 29. from uniting with us. Not only was the Irish press everywhere unanimous in this attitude, but the foremost Catholic prelate in the land, Bishop Hughes of New York, impugned the genuineness Lib. 12.43, 47. of the Address, and, genuine or not, declared it the duty of every naturalized Irishman to resist and repudiate it with indignation, as emanating from a foreign source. All the Irish Repeal associations—at the South Lib. 12.47, 50, 82. particularly—took the same line, with explicit devotion to the existing institutions of their adopted country, however much they might deprecate slavery in the abstract. In short, the Address was n
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
1849. to Elizabeth Pease, where there were sixteen grog-shops, his presence closed all but three. In the midst of this popularity Father Mathew was suddenly made the subject of vehement discussion all over the country, and even in the Capitol itself. He was now well on in years, being nearly sixty, and ill-prepared on this score to maintain in America the anti-slavery pretensions lightly made in Ireland. He was, moreover, a Catholic and a priest; and doubtless, during his stay with Bishop Hughes in New York, had been warned by that Lib. 18.126. slaveite to avoid contact with the abolitionists. The Bishop had already had to resort to the pious fraud of impeaching the genuineness of Father Mathew's Ante, p. 44. signature to the Irish Address, and was not anxious to be confuted by the Apostle's action on this side of the Atlantic. But the Board of Managers of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society had a plain duty—out of respect to Father Mathew's integrity as a man, and gratit