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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 162 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Nevada (Nevada, United States) or search for Nevada (Nevada, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
is becoming known, it naturally brings in many persons, both from the city and neighboring villages, to make inquiries after my health. Benjamin and J. Elizabeth Jones of Salem have been to see me; so has a sister of S. S. Foster, who is residing here. George Bradburn is a daily visitor at my bedside. Everybody is kindly offering me all needed assistance. Fortunately, I am in one of the best families in the world, That of Thomas and Marian Jones, parents of the future Senator Jones of Nevada (Lib. 17: 174). and have everything done for me, by day and by night, that you could desire. I miss nothing, need nothing, but your dear presence and that of the darling children. God preserve you all from harm. A thousand kisses for them—as many for you—on my return. Should you have written to me at Syracuse, I shall get the letter, as I intend to spend a day with dear S. J. May. Douglass left here on Sept. 14. Tuesday noon. Your improving husband. Nothing but the indiscreet newsp
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
es Follen Garrison. Garrison vindicates free discussion of the Bible in the Liberator. The historian of the anti-slavery cause—or of the country—for the year we have now reached, must tell of the two great tides of feeling and passion surging from North to South and from South to North, over the question of the Federal Territories. Should the Wilmot Proviso secure to California and New Mexico Not merely the area we now know by that name, but nearly the whole of Arizona, with parts of Nevada and Colorado. See Map XV., Statistical Atlas U. S. Census, 1880. the freedom decreed them by the country from which they had been torn; should the Missouri Compromise line of 1820 be extended to the Pacific; or should the contention of the Southern extremists prevail, viz., that slave property had, equally with all other kinds of property, a right to be taken into any part of the national domain not definitively organized and admitted as one of the States of the Union? Should, again, the r