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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ection, it enlarges its boundaries, multiplies its victims, and extends its ravages. In the same number of the Liberator the editor printed with unfeigned surprise, deep mortification, and extreme regret, a circular addressed to the press of New-York by the Executive Committee of the American Society, and signed by James S. Gibbons and Lydia Maria Child. They regretted that the Liberator articles on disunion Lib. 12.71. had been so construed as to commit the Society, in the public view, ine. Our friend S. S. Foster then took the platform, and was allowed to proceed without much interruption until he made his favorite declaration, in his most excited manner, that the Methodist Episcopal Church is worse than any brothel in the city of New York. Then came such an outbreak of hisses, cries, curses! All order was at an end. Several ruffians rushed toward the platform to seize Foster, but were not allowed to reach him. The tumult became tremendous. Several citizens, who were well k
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
ope not. Public opinion should be regulated. These abolitionists should not be allowed to misrepresent New York. He besought his regulators to go on Tuesday morning to the Tabernacle, and there look at the black and white brethren and sisters, fraternizing, slobbering over each other, speaking, praying, singing, blaspheming, and cursing the Constitution of our glorious Union, and then say whether these things shall go forth to the South and the world as the feeling of the great city of New York. Every citizen has a right, legally, and more than morally, to have his say at the amalgamation meeting on Tuesday. The Union expects every man to do his duty; and duty to the Union, in the present crisis, points out to us that we should allow no more fuel to be placed upon the fire of abolitionism in our midst, when we can prevent it by sound reasoning and calm remonstrances. May 7, 1850. On May 2, the Herald returned to the subject, drawing somewhat nearer to the leader of the