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Browsing named entities in James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. You can also browse the collection for September 7th or search for September 7th in all documents.

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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
uncertain and unsatisfactory speculations of German philosophy, tells us how at length he came to quit Hegel, and to quote the Bible with Uncle Tom,--came, too, to see that there was a higher wisdom in the poor slave's simple faith than in the great philosopher's dialectics, and found peace and satisfaction in kneeling with his praying brother, Uncle Tom. After various excursions, to Paris, to Switzerland, to Germany, Mrs. Stowe returned to England and re-embarked for America on the 7th of September. In the following year she published an account of these European experiences, in the form of letters written to friends at home, under the title of Sunny memories of foreign lands, to which her husband contributed an introduction, in which some account is given of the public meetings which were held in her honor during the tour through England and Scotland. About this time a new and enlarged edition of the Mayflower was also published. Established in her home once more, and resto
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. (search)
ever heard a woman in public, and felt great curiosity to hear her, they adjourned the convention, resolved themselves into a committee of the whole, and invited her to address them. The following sketch from an eyewitness will give some idea of the effect she produced on Southern men-- A good-natured view Of some matters in and about the Convention is given in the following spicy letter of James Redpath to the Boston Traveller: -- The address of Anna E. Dickinson. Philadelphia, Sept. 7. My last despatch from the Convention predicted that the border statesmen would receive a lecture from Anna Dickinson, and stated that they acted as if they anticipated it. This prediction was formed from the appearance of the Maryland delegation, and a knowledge of the character of the orator; and it was fulfilled. It was curious to note the audience. There sat, directly in front of the platform, three or four hundred Southern men, few of whom had ever heard a woman speak,--few of w