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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. You can also browse the collection for Grace Greenwood or search for Grace Greenwood in all documents.

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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Fanny Fern-Mrs. Parton. (search)
Fanny Fern-Mrs. Parton. Grace Greenwood. Sara Payson Willis, daughter of Nathaniel and Sara Willis, was born in Portland, Maine, in midsummer of the year of our Lord 1811. In that fine old town, in that fine old State, where as she says, the timber and the human beings are sound, she spent the first six years of her life. During those years, our country passed through a troublous time, -a supplementary grapple with the old country,--final, let us hope, and eminently satisfactory in its der, --an honest easy-going fellow, who is little inclined to raise fine points in regard to an author's manner of expression, provided the feeling be all right. I remember thinking that this bold rival was poaching a little on my own merrie Greenwood preserves; but as I watched her cool proceedings, saw how unerring was her aim, and with what an air of proprietorship she bagged her game, I declined to prosecute, and went to Europe. When I returned I found she had the whole domain to hersel
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Grace Greenwood-Mrs. Lippincott. (search)
Grace Greenwood-Mrs. Lippincott. Joseph B. Lyman. About thirty years ago, when Andrew Jacksoppropriate and elegant! This charming Grace Greenwood, so natural, so chatty, so easy, chanting hen these times, and among these people, Grace Greenwood now began to live and move, and have a part,full idea of these earlier writings of Grace Greenwood. They had the dew of youth, the purple lighh that springs and frolics through it. Grace Greenwood is not the woman to be the president of a sowritings from 1845 to 1852., will find it in Greenwood leaves, first and second series. About thistices from the great dailies, the braider of Greenwood chaplets has come back to her cottage-home ar sex so able or so eloquent to-day as Grace Greenwood,--we can but endorse this sentiment of one oady tourist from America has surpassed Grace Greenwood in the warm tinting and gorgeous rhetoric ove. There appear in the writings of Grace Greenwood three phases of development, three epochs of
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Victoria, Queen of England. (search)
r children say their lessons herself. Thus on board the yacht, she writes, I contrived to give Vicky (Victoria, the princess royal) a little lesson by making her read in her English history. On this subject our own gifted and excellent Grace Greenwood has recently related some extremely pleasing anecdotes. When I was in England, writes Grace Greenwood, in the Advance I heard several pleasant anecdotes of the queen and her family, from a lady who received them of her friend, the govGreenwood, in the Advance I heard several pleasant anecdotes of the queen and her family, from a lady who received them of her friend, the governess of the royal children. This governess, a very interesting young lady, was the orphan daughter of a Scottish clergyman. During the first year of her residence at Windsor, her mother died. When she first received news of her serious illness, she applied to the queen for permission to resign her situation, feeling that to her mother she owed a more sacred duty than even to her sovereign. The queen, who had been much pleased with her, would not hear of her making this sacrifice, but said