hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 58 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. You can also browse the collection for Jenny Lind or search for Jenny Lind in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 2 document sections:

James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Jenny Lind Goldschmidt. (search)
style heroic was necessary to perfect it. Jenny Lind is a native of Sweden. She was born at Stocthese, in the eleventh year of her age, that Jenny Lind made her first appearance in public. The paesirable Alice, the director thought of poor Jenny Lind, and offered it to her. She accepted it and glass of wine with her. He replied : Miss Lind, I do not think you can ask any other favor ach concert were $7,496. The sum received by Jenny Lind was $176,675. Mr. Barnum's receipts, after penchanting the United States it remained for Jenny Lind to conquer the fastidious and difficult publ at the time in the New York Tribune:-- Jenny Lind appeared, led on by Signor Belletti. Some t verily believe mortal never breathed except Jenny Lind, and mortal never heard except from her lips The triumph was most complete. And how was Jenny Lind affected? She, who stood a few moments previcient, and, after the ninety-fifth concert, Jenny Lind desired the contract to be annulled, and to [18 more...]
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Camilla Urso (search)
rvices were not forthcoming, and the engagement was hastily broken. The Germania Society now offered an engagement, and the little Urso played for them a year, meeting everywhere with great applause and admiration. At the end of the year she joined Madame Alboni, who was then singing in this country, and performed at six concerts with her in Trippler Hall, New York. In 1852 Madame Henriette Sontag, Countess Rossi, came to this country to make a trial of the public which had received Jenny Lind with such enthusiasm and generosity. She won honors everywhere by her dramatic talent and marvellous voice. Hearing of Camilla Urso's success, she proposed to add her to her own concert-troupe. At the conclusion of his daughter's engagement with Alboni, Signor Urso accepted the overtures of Sontag, and Camilla joined her at Cincinnati, in December, 1853. Brief as was their connection, the most tender relations were established between them. Nothing could be more beautiful than the