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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 54 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 24 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 15 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. You can also browse the collection for Florence Nightingale or search for Florence Nightingale in all documents.

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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Florence Nightingale. (search)
Florence Nightingale. James Parton. Florence Nightingale is one of the fortunate of the earthFlorence Nightingale is one of the fortunate of the earth. Inheriting from nature a striking and beneficent talent, she was able to cultivate that talent inry gentleman; but not for a long time. Miss Nightingale, born into the Church of England, was thehad but a feeble life and limited means. Miss Nightingale, on her return from Germany, was informedthus acquainted with the peculiar bent of Miss Nightingale's disposition, and the nature of her traiional nurses. October the 24th, 1854, Florence Nightingale, accompanied by a clerical friend and hand patients under her immediate charge. Miss Nightingale, one of the gentlest and tenderest of womng manner, the appearance and demeanor of Miss Nightingale. In appearance, he says, she is just what length, to employ this fund in enabling Miss Nightingale to establish an institution for the trainThere can be no doubt that the example of Miss Nightingale had much to do in calling forth the exert[16 more...]
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Rosa Bonheur. (search)
ssential merits, and she stands proudly, but unambitiously, the full, intellectual peer of man. Genius has no sex. The qualities of the masculine and feminine minds, while profoundly harmonious, even in their contrasts, and together forming the perfect man, are, doubtless, as a general thing, differently made up in their relative proportions and dispositions, according to the varied needs of their life-work. In the masculine mind, perhaps, the constructive and philosophic elements are more prominently controlling, and in the feminine mind the intuitive and sympathetic; yet there is — the same mind in both, the same fiery particle, the same imperial and divine faculty, whether It is shown in the ruling ability of a Henry IV. of France, or an Elizabeth of England; in the philanthropic capacity of a John Howard, or a Florence Nightingale; in the literary scope and depth of an Alfred Tennyson, or a Mrs. Browning; in the creative artistic power of an Edwin Landseer, or a Rosa Bonheur