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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 5: the Jubilee.—1865. (search)
e first great Parrott gun Lib. 34.114. at Charleston was a Liberator subscriber. But scenes and events still more dramatic and impressive were to come, and it is not probable that the United States will ever see the parallel in this respect of the ninety days ending with the month of April, 1865. Threatened by the triumphant Northern march of Sherman's army, the rebel forces defending Fort Sumter and Charleston abandoned both, and they fell into the hands of the Union forces on the 18th of February. Three days later the 55th Massachusetts Regiment entered the city, singing exultantly the John Brown song; and when Lieut. Lib. 35.39. George Thompson Garrison halted his company in the streets, he was greeted by James Redpath, the biographer of John Brown, and the then correspondent of the New York Tribune. Redpath it was who now went promptly Lib. 35.56. to work to establish free schools in the deserted cradle of secession, ignoring all complexional distinctions among the pupils.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 7: the National Testimonial.—1866. (search)
the oration began, and was standing back near the door, when Speaker Colfax got Schuyler Colfax. his eye upon me, and instantly sent a messenger to conduct me to a seat near to Secretary Stanton, Judge Chase, and E. M. Stanton. other notables. After the services, I spoke to Stanton, who S. P. Chase. expressed great regret that he was not at home last evening, and said he would not be absent again if I would call. Mr. Garrison's first call on reaching Washington was on Senator Sumner (Feb. 18). Sumner almost made a declamatory speech about universal suffrage, and intends making another in the Senate on the same subject (Ms. Feb. 19, 1866, W. L. G. to H. E. G.). I was introduced to a large number of Senators, Representatives, and persons from various parts of the country, and warmly received. To-morrow evening I am to lecture in the Union League Hall. . . . On Sunday evening I expect to address the colored people in one of their churches. The Union League Hall was a small