Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Garrett Davis or search for Garrett Davis in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
es to keep the Liberator alive by raising its price. Early in the new year Mr. Garrison yielded to the urgent solicitation of friends in New York, and delivered a lecture, at Cooper Institute in that city, on Jan. 14. The Abolitionists and their Relations to the War, which subsequently received a wide circulation in pamphlet form. The pulpit and Rostrum, Nos. 26 and 27 (double number), containing the above-named lecture, a pro-slavery speech in the U. S. Senate (Jan. 23, 1862) by Garrett Davis of Kentucky, and Alexander H. Stephens's speech (March 21, 1861) declaring African slavery the corner-stone of the Southern Confederacy. New York, 1862 (Lib. 32: 39). In this he vindicated the motives and Lib. 32.14. methods of the Garrisonian abolitionists; replied effectively to the assertions that they were wholly responsible for the war, or had been equally guilty with the secessionists in precipitating it; answered the cry that slavery had nothing to do with the war, and the Gover
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 7: the National Testimonial.—1866. (search)
of Lyman Trumbull. treatment, pulverizing the President's veto [of the Freedmen's Bureau Bill], and showing him to have falsified all its provisions and purposes. I have also listened to the reading of a speech by that Kentucky factionist, Garrett Davis, in support of the veto. The Copperhead strength is very weak, in intellect and numbers, in both houses of Congress. Last evening, I called with Harry at Secretary Stanton's Henry Villard. residence, but he and his wife had gone out to so address them! I am sure the bottomless pit is equally jubilant. I have just come, with Franky, from the Capitol, where a most F. J. G. fitting and eloquent eulogium has been bestowed upon the character and services of the late Henry Winter Davis by Senator Creswell of Maryland. The hall of the House was crowded in J. A. J. Creswell. every part. The Judges of the Supreme Court were present— the leading military men—dignitaries of all kinds—Senators and Representatives, etc. I got in af<