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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
r Review, Spectator, Nonconformist, British Standard, Dial, Birmingham Post, The Birmingham Post published an instructive series of letters on the American question from the pen of Mr. Samuel A. Goddard, an American gentleman long resident in that city, and a brother of Mrs. Mary May. They were subsequently collected in a volume (London, 1870). Manchester Examiner, Newcastle Chronicle, Caledonian Mercury, Belfast Whig, The Belfast Whig was the most influential journal in the north of Ireland. Its editor, Mr. Frank Harrison Hill, afterwards succeeded Thomas Walker as editor of the Daily News. and a host of other representatives of the fourth estate, have never departed from the pure faith. The working classes also have proved to be sound to the core, whenever their opinion has been tested. Witness the noble demonstration of Manchester operatives the other day, when three thousand of these noble sons of labor (many of whom were actual sufferers from the cotton famine) adopted
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
rd Miall, Frederic Harrison, Geo. J. Holyoake, William Black, and scores of others. Of Mr. Garrison's English anti-slavery friends there were the Ashursts, Stansfelds, Shaens, Taylors, Thompsons, and Chessons; and Richard D. Webb came over from Ireland for the occasion. America was represented by the U. S. Consul at London (Mr. Morse), and by a number of anti-slavery friends who were happily in London—Mrs. Chapman's daughters and the Rev. William Henry Channing being among these, while Miss Sdistinguish themselves in intellectual progress as much as any race of our own color. Having this additional source of sympathy and fellow-feeling, let us hope that the friendship of the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland may endure unbroken, and that Mr. Garrison may carry with him, amongst other gratifications, this reflection, that our meeting here to-day has tended to the better union of two races who ought never to be separated. (Great cheering.) Any on