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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
l kinds. Works, Vol. V. pp. 236-239. Stearns was the grandson of Rev. Jonathan French, of Andover, whose care for Sumner's father as a boy has already been mentioned. Formerly a clergyman in Newburyport, he is now the pastor of a Presbyterian church in Newark, N. J. He took high rank in college, and has fulfilled his early promise. Hopkinson received the highest honors in the class. He was as a student quite mature, and was older than most of his classmates. He practised law in Lowell, became a judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and was afterwards president of the Boston and Worcester Railroad Corporation. He died in 1856. Tower practised law for a time, and then diverged from the profession. He removed to Pottsville, Pa., and has been identified with the management of railroads. Sumner was one of the youngest members of his class. With the advantage of the thorough discipline of the Latin School, he took rank among its best classical scholars. He excelled in t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
destrian tour. It will be the best way to further your intellectual progress. Give that pallid face a little color, those lean limbs a little muscle, and the bow of your mind a greater elasticity. Again, on May 9, 1833, Hopkinson wrote from Lowell, where he was practising law as the partner of Mr. Luther Lawrence: Had I but your application, I might consider myself in a good way. Not, indeed, that I could grasp such honors as are within your reach; not that I could walk over the headrneying. Come down East. Dismiss your books and the toils of study. You may think this interested advice; and in part it is, though not wholly so. I feel it would be beneficial to you. It would be a joyous event to me. Hopkinson wrote from Lowell, July 13:— Dear Charles,—I regret to learn that you are to stay yet a term further at Cambridge, for I had calculated on your coming here this fall. Yet nothing is so like yourself as to stay to please your friend [Judge Story],— and such <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. Having finished his studies at Cambridge in Dec., 1833, Sumner entered as a student, Jan. 8, 1834, His father noted the day in his interleaved copy of Thomas's Farmer's Almanac. His classmate Hopkinson had desired Sumner to enter his office at Lowell, and Mr. Alvord also invited him to his office in Greenfield. the law-office of Benjamin Rand, Court Street, Boston; a lawyer having a large practice, but distinguished rather for his great learning and faithful attention to the business of his clients than for any attractive forensic qualities. Mr. Rand in the autumn of 1834 visited England, where he was well received by lawyers and judges. His partner, Mr. A. H. Fiske, remained in charge of the office. He had access to the remarkably well-stored library of Mr. Rand, which was enriched on the arrival of almost every English packet. He followed very much his tastes while in the<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
ner's name does not appear in the report of the case. Among his papers is an elaborate opinion, written in 1835, which reviews at length the authorities on a question arising under the law of watercourses,—whether the proprietors of mills at Lowell on the Merrimac River, which is fed by the waters of Lake Winnipiseogee, have a right of action against parties who divert for mill-uses the waters of Merrymeeting Pond, which flow into the Lake. In June, 1835, he was appointed by Judge Story l. The two lectures are a simple statement of the rules of law pertinent to each topic, with familiar illustrations from business life. He received an invitation, in Jan., 1836, which he does not appear to have accepted, to deliver a lecture at Lowell, before the Moral Lyceum. He read, Feb. 28, 1837, a lecture on The Constitution of the United States in the Smith Schoolhouse, Belknap Street, before the Adelphic Union Society,—a literary association of colored people. Hillard delivered the in