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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
promptly returned the fee. The delicacy with which the affair was managed by the English proctors Messrs. Crockett & Son. was admirable,—most unlike what I experienced in Paris, or what would happen, in casu consimili, in America. Tell Washington Allston that a brother artist of great distinction—Mr. Collins William Collins, 1787-1847. A memoir of this landscape painter has been written by his son, William Wilkie Collins, the novelist.—inquired after him in a most affectionate manner, and wished to be remembered to him. Southey told Collins that he thought some of Allston's poems were among the finest productions of modern times. Mr. and Mrs. Gaily Knight are reading Prescott, and admire him very much. I know few people whose favorable judgment is more to be valued than his. I have spoken with Macaulay about an American edition of his works. He has received no communication from any publisher on the subject, and seemed to be coy and disinclined. He said they were trifles,<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
promptly returned the fee. The delicacy with which the affair was managed by the English proctors Messrs. Crockett & Son. was admirable,—most unlike what I experienced in Paris, or what would happen, in casu consimili, in America. Tell Washington Allston that a brother artist of great distinction—Mr. Collins William Collins, 1787-1847. A memoir of this landscape painter has been written by his son, William Wilkie Collins, the novelist.—inquired after him in a most affectionate manner, and wished to be remembered to him. Southey told Collins that he thought some of Allston's poems were among the finest productions of modern times. Mr. and Mrs. Gaily Knight are reading Prescott, and admire him very much. I know few people whose favorable judgment is more to be valued than his. I have spoken with Macaulay about an American edition of his works. He has received no communication from any publisher on the subject, and seemed to be coy and disinclined. He said they were trifles,<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
e productive of benefit and honor to himself, the college, and our country. Thank God! I am an American. Much as there is to offend me in our country, yet it is the best country to be born in on the face of the globe. In his tribute to Washington Allston, Aug. 27, 1846, there is a description of Italy which was inspired by the memories of these days:– Turning his back upon Paris and the greatness of the Empire, he directed his steps towards Italy, the enchanted ground of literature, hr, &c.; all these various characters being blended in the group. The Abdiel is taken just as he has concluded his speech to Satan and is turning to leave him. It is a winged, heaven-born Achilles. The subject was suggested to Greenough by Washington Allston, years ago. The statue is about three or four feet high; but Greenough means to make one as large as the Apollo Belvedere. He has also done a beautiful little bas-relief for Mr. Salisbury,—the angel telling St. John not to address his pray
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
Soon after his return Sumner became the friend of Washington Allston, whom he often visited at Cambridgeport, and with whI became acquainted. Those mentioned are Story, Channing, Allston, Bancroft, Ticknor, Longfellow, R. W. Emerson, and Prescot 12, and was rejoiced to see your handwriting again. . . . Allston has inquired a great deal about you, and will be delightedhair, and that sweet look of feeling which you find in all Allston's pictures, particularly of women,—qualem decet esse sororou write will be read, and have weight. I have not seen Allston for some weeks. Longfellow and myself passed an evening wmake it even, said he. I hope you may realize your dream. Allston would bud anew in Italy. He is now laboring sedulously upeenough. Boston, Sept. 16, 1841. dear Greenough,—. . . Allston has a little novel Monaldi. in press, written twenty yene with him on the evening of your arrival. You will meet Allston and Prescott and one or two academics, whose talk and the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
Crawford,—The moments pass, and I can only say that Allston is dead. He died suddenly, having passed a very ha consult Greenough about this; he was the friend of Allston. I showed Allston your letter to me. He had alwaysAllston your letter to me. He had always taken a very warm interest in your success. There are serious difficulties in the way of a proper place forhall summon him as counsellor. You have heard of Allston's death. The last two times that I saw him we spoksal of it. You ask if there is any other picture of Allston's to be had. There is a landscape belonging to Mr. the picture were in the warmer and later manner of Allston, it would be worth more than as many thousands. Its completion. As many years would not suffice now. Allston made several vital changes, which involved a new cad some artists who have seen it. As yet, not even Mr. Allston's friends have been allowed to see it. It is suppts of it are supposed to be equal to any thing from Allston's hand. The chances for Clay are supposed to inc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
bs, he was now the only bachelor. He mourned in Cleveland a friend full of tenderness and sympathy. Loving humanity, he had found inspiration and strength in his intercourse with Channing; and, loving art, he had enjoyed his frequent visits to Allston: but these cherished resorts had been closed by death. He was now thirty-three, and saw most of his contemporaries no longer solitary, but set in families. He felt alone; and was unhappy at the thought of his isolation. To his intimate friendom Springfield. She is more delicate and feeble; but her cheerful heart sees in the future pleasant visions—summer, autumn, winter, all open before her—in the illusions of hope. She looks like an angel. I am going this morning with her to see Allston's Belshazzar, which is a great though unfinished creation of genius. I walked with Fisher last evening. He is well; and every thing goes on well. Lieber, you know, is in Europe. My brother George is in Paris: he hopes to see you. You will fi