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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Michael Angelo or search for Michael Angelo in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
The last number I am told contains a very complimentary article on Hyperion, written by Samuel Ward. January 4. A happy New Year to you and Mrs. Greene, and Ponto. May your plans thrive. I wish you could give up article-writing and the thought of making translations, and apply yourself entirely to your Opus Maximum. Ranke, the historian of the Popes, I know. He is an ardent, lively, indefatigable person. He once obtained permission to search the manuscripts of the Vatican. Mai Angelo Mai, 1782-1854; discoverer of Cicero de Republica and other palimpsests, and at one time Librarian of the Vatican. attended him, and they took down a volume which contained several different things; Ranke at once struck upon a manuscript upon the Inquisition. Mai tore this out of the book and threw it aside. The French had the Vatican in their hands ten or more years. It is strange they did not bring out its hidden treasures. I like Ranke better than Von Raumer. Both are professors at B
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, January 4. (search)
January 4. A happy New Year to you and Mrs. Greene, and Ponto. May your plans thrive. I wish you could give up article-writing and the thought of making translations, and apply yourself entirely to your Opus Maximum. Ranke, the historian of the Popes, I know. He is an ardent, lively, indefatigable person. He once obtained permission to search the manuscripts of the Vatican. Mai Angelo Mai, 1782-1854; discoverer of Cicero de Republica and other palimpsests, and at one time Librarian of the Vatican. attended him, and they took down a volume which contained several different things; Ranke at once struck upon a manuscript upon the Inquisition. Mai tore this out of the book and threw it aside. The French had the Vatican in their hands ten or more years. It is strange they did not bring out its hidden treasures. I like Ranke better than Von Raumer. Both are professors at Berlin. Our countryman, Dr. Robinson, Dr. Edward Robinson, 1794-1863; a distinguished Biblical schol
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
To Thomas Crawford. Boston, Aug. 1, 1843. my dear Crawford,—The Orpheus has not arrived, though from your letter I am led to expect it daily. I cannot disguise from you my trouble with regard to the placing of it. The Athenaeum possesses a very considerable collection of sculpture exhibited in a room originally contrived as an evening lecture-room, without any reference to the object to which it is now applied. It is dark, and with cross lights. The magnificent Day and Night of Michael Angelo, with their bold beauties, can be discerned only imperfectly, while busts and other smaller works of sculpture lose their effect. The Orpheus must not go there; but where to put it we are at a loss. It has been proposed to exhibit it in a room in another part of the town, and afterwards remove it to one of the smaller rooms of the Athenaeum. But I feel unwilling to superintend its removal twice: it must take its permanent place on the pedestal when it is unboxed. The effect of the st