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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 97 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 37 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 35 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 18 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for George Bancroft or search for George Bancroft in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
for hostile purposes by Canadian insurgents— inflamed public feeling against Great Britain, and raised vexed questions concerning the inviolability of national territory, and the jurisdiction of courts over acts assumed by a foreign government. The restriction or prohibition of the sale of ardent spirits —a controversy which forty years of agitation have not settled —was for the first time disturbing politicians. Richard Fletcher was re-elected to Congress as the member for Boston. George Bancroft was appointed Collector of the Port, and Robert C. Winthrop chosen Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch, author of The Practical Navigator and translator of the Mecanique Celeste, ended a career dedicated to science. George Combe, of Edinburgh, was delivering lectures on phrenology in Boston. Horace Mann was urging with prodigious earnestness and industry the cause of education. Daniel Webster was about to sail for Europe on his only foreign j<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
berg; then down the Rhine to Cologne; then to Brussels, Antwerp, London,—where I shall be at the end of January,—thence to sail for America. If this letter reaches you by the British Queen, do not fail to write me by the return. Give my love to all my friends; and tell them I shall soon see them. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Cogswell Dr. Joseph Green Cogswell, 1786-1871. He was in 1816 a student at Gottingen with Edward Everett and George Ticknor; in 1823, with George Bancroft, established the Round Hill School at Northampton, Mass., and in 1848 became the Superintendent of the Astor Library. has just arrived at Dresden. I have not seen him; but he speaks of Hyperion as one of the best books that has ever come from our country. To George W. Greene. Berlin, Dec. 30, 1839. dear Greene,—Would I were with you in Rome! Every day I chide myself because I was so idle and remiss while in that Mother-City. I regret that I left so many things unseen, and saw <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
cholars of the day,—Sparks, Ticknor, Palfrey, Bancroft, Felton, Longfellow, and Hillard. Mr. Evern the literary work of his friends, Prescott, Bancroft, Sparks, Story, and Greenleaf,—all active at welcome than that of clients. Of these, only Bancroft survives. He was then writing his History of at the Tremont House, where Story, Prescott, Bancroft, Ticknor, Choate, Hillard, Felton, and Longfer materials for a history of the Revolution. Bancroft's third volume is just published. It is brile Ticknors I see a great deal. I see much of Bancroft, and know him familiarly. His third volume o of the American Revolution. He will go over Bancroft's ground; but they will hardly interfere withrough examination of the original documents. Bancroft's will be a series of brilliant sketches, fulking the American reader love his country. Bancroft has resigned his Collectorship, and Governor ubject; and happy he who can do this. I like Bancroft's history very much. It is not complete, per[1 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ending with an appeal to Varus and his legions, were written in a happy moment. I honor your learning in the notes. It is most pertinent,— like the spontaneous oozings of a well saturated mind, not hastily huddled together for the nonce. Mr. Bancroft, while differing in some respects from Sumner's conclusions, wrote:— Your argument is written with great ability,—humane, scholar-like, and deeply interesting. I respect the power, I delight in the pure feeling, of the writer; while my thousand copies during one year for seventy-five hundred dollars. Few authors of historical works have met with Prescott's success with the trade. He has written without the most remote idea of profit; but fortune has descended upon his crest. Bancroft is earnestly engaged upon the History of the American Revolution. I anticipate from him a very brilliant and powerful tableau. He will present at once the principle and the poetry of that event. The North American for July contains a dainty pa<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
ng its partisans Sumner counted personal friends, like George Bancroft and Theodore Sedgwick, with whose culture and generous the brothers Chandler were constant in their inquiries. Bancroft enlivened the sick-chamber with his conversation, always u know doubtless, in the ranks of Locofocoism in Boston. Bancroft adheres to Van Buren; all the rest,—Greene, Post, & Co.,—h me in thinking that all has been for the best. . . . Bancroft's History of the Revolution goes to press in June. He haigs has never, to my eyes, looked more auspicious; though Bancroft assures me he has no doubt that Polk will be elected, andk, under all the circumstances, with indignation. Still, Bancroft, who is the leader of his faction in New England, and in eceding Harrison's election. Turn we to other topics. Bancroft's History of the American Revolution has gone to press; augh about myself. . . . Yesterday, the Locos nominated Bancroft as their candidate for Governor. He has made me a very a