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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 82 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 62 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 25 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 14 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 13 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Rufus Choate or search for Rufus Choate in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
ad overhauled the Tigris, and brought her into one of our ports. Rufus Choate and Mr. Perkins, of Salem, were the plaintiff's counsel. Sumnerugh and Crawford. He much enjoyed his friendly relations with Rufus Choate, whose office was at No. 4 Court Street. They talked of politics and literature,—particularly of Burke, for whom Mr. Choate had an extravagant admiration. When the latter was in the United States Senate, e between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Works and Memoir of Rufus Choate, Vol. I. pp. 57, 61-63, 74, 75. The Five of Clubs, now withner at the Tremont House, where Story, Prescott, Bancroft, Ticknor, Choate, Hillard, Felton, and Longfellow were among the guests; and was prethis high duty, as it is read in all languages and countries. . . . Choate will be glad to renew his acquaintance with you. His speech on McLeod's case is masterly. June 11, 1841. Works and Memoir of Rufus Choate, Vol. II. pp. 3-23. It exhausts the question. When shall we see y
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
he municipal doctrines of a particular country. Letters approving his view came also from Rufus Choate and Theodore Sedgwick. The peculiar character of slave ownership as against common right, written me that he has no hesitation in subscribing to it, as sound, logical, and conclusive. Mr. Choate, of the Senate, gives it his assent. I do not know what Mr. Webster thinks about it. To Lhere have been brought to a conclusion here without resorting to Washington. I am glad you like Choate so well. His position here is very firm. He is the leader of our bar, with an overwhelming suate some fit person for this place; Ticknor, who is, perhaps, Webster's warmest personal friend; Choate, who has Webster's place in the Senate; and Abbott Lawrence: but no notice was taken of the appls had made him for once doubt the uniform hostile intentions of England to the United States. Choate thinks you were influenced by the desire to save all the money we owe your subjects. I told him
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
im personally, however, till I became an inmate of No. 4. This building, at the corner of Court and Washington Streets, became quite famous from the number and ability of some of the men who occupied the rooms for many years. Among them were Rufus Choate, Theophilus Parsons, Horace Mann, George S. Hillard, Francis B. Crowninshield, Luther S. Cushing, John A. Andrew, Joel Giles, Edward G. Loring, John O. Sargent, Theophilus P. Chandler, and William G. Stearns. There was a great deal of law busious accomplishments and elevated tastes,—preserving his purity of heart amidst all the attractions of London life. I do not think Mary is better; she is very cold and pale. She is always charmed by kindness, and does not forget yours. Choate is entirely uncommitted on the subject of international copyright. He has never looked at it; and if he sees his way clear to be its advocate, he will enter into it. He asked me to state to him, in a few words, the arguments on both sides. I th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
puted territory. This service was rendered at the request of Mr. Webster and Mr. Choate, the counsel of Massachusetts, who certified, when the question of his compennal fee which it was rarely his good fortune to receive in a single case. To Mr. Choate's kindly interest he was doubtless indebted for the opportunity to earn it. His connection with the case is referred to in Mr. Choate's Works and Memoir, Vol. I. pp. 74, 75. See Boston Advertiser, Feb. 22, 1844. The Council Records of Masthis week to try some oysters. Will you come? I will join you. . . . You know Choate leaves the Senate, March 1. How Clay's sun is rising! He will be our Presiden and let his house for three years to the new British Minister, Mr. Pakenham. Mr. Choate had intended to resign, hoping for Webster. as his successor; but it was fouan edition of Brown's Chancery Reports. cannot fail to give great pleasure to Mr. Choate. It is a beautiful, and I think a well deserved, tribute from a former pupil
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
f this statement. Ante, Vol. I. pp. 153, 154. During the years 1840-45, as always, Sumner gave a considerable portion of his time to correspondence. Besides writing to his English and other foreign friends and to his brother George, he wrote to many American friends,--Dr. Lieber, Theodore Sedgwick, Benjamin D. Silliman, John Jay, Jacob Harvey, Samuel Ward, George Gibbs, Charles S. Daveis, George W. Greene, Thomas Crawford, Edward Everett (then Minister to England), Theodore S. Fay, Rufus Choate (while in the Senate),—and to his intimate friends, Cleveland, Longfellow, Hillard, and Howe, when they were travelling. Then as always a friend's handwriting gave him the keenest enjoyment. No day was to him complete, whose morning mail did not bring him a packet of letters; and all who are familiar with his daily life will recall the zest with which he opened and read them. He was always interested in the literary projects of his friends, and answered readily calls for help in obtain
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
uth Church and Faneuil Hall, or, during recent years, in more convenient resorts, as the Tremont Temple, Music Hall, and Boston Theatre. The mayor and aldermen, common council and other city officers, have marched in procession with music and military escort to the appointed place, attended by a concourse of citizens who have filled the seats and aisles. The list of orators includes some who have left an enduring memory; but conspicuous by their absence from it are the names of Webster and Choate. Sometimes a veteran orator has been summoned from his retirement, as Mr. Everett in 1860, and Mr. Winthrop in 1876,—each speaking with undiminished vigor, and adding another to his many triumphs. But generally, from the early period to the present, young men under thirty or thirty-five have been selected for the service. John Adams wrote in 1816 of these orations Letter to Dr. J. Morse, 5 January, 1816. Works of John Adams, Vol. X. pp. 203, 204:— The town of Boston instituted