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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 176 4 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 21 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Crawford or search for Thomas Crawford in all documents.

Your search returned 90 results in 9 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
om he rendered a most important service. Thomas Crawford was then toiling in his studio, waiting fful piece of work, like every thing else from Crawford's chisel. The bust is among the works of art took the shape of earnest acts of kindness. Crawford was then modelling one of his first statues, marble that he succeeded in his purpose; and Crawford owes to him his first commission for a statue and never failed to chant his praise. After Crawford's death, we went together over his studio; aniends a letter soon about an artist here, Mr. T. Crawford, for whom I am anxious that something shoin which you and others may contribute to put Crawford in the same position. . . . I am sorry to tro Nothing that I have seen alters my faith in Crawford. Let him go on, and his way is clear. Rememave had to do with in other places. To Thomas Crawford. Milan, Oct. 5, 1839. dear Crawford,—alf! I shall then hear from the letters about Crawford. How good it would be, if the Franklin and O[23 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
s hind-legs, one head fast asleep, the next on the ground, eyes half open, the next raised and gaping. I write this for Crawford. They have the sense here to admire Thorwaldsen, Albert Bertel Thorwaldsen, the Danish sculptor. 1770-1844. and ther, I found on my arrival at this place. I am delighted at the success of the Orpheus. I am glad you have written about Crawford for the Knickerbocker. My letters are strangely behind, and I have no advices with regard to what I wrote home. I shal some truth in that bust of me, after what you say of Sir C. Vaughan. I am pleased that he ordered his bust; it will do Crawford good. Many of our countrymen are so weak as to make their judgments depend upon Englishmen, and I know none of his counm these sights which have filled me with so many throbs; down to the bottom of the well I must throw the magic rod. Tell Crawford to write me. I rely much for my future happiness upon my friends in Europe. Don't let me lose the vision of Rome and of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, January 4. (search)
s, of his age, I have ever known. He proposes to stay in Europe two or three years more; to visit Germany, France, and perhaps Spain, as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. I leave Berlin in a few days for Heidelberg, whence I shall go down the Rhine to Cologne, then to Brussels, Antwerp, London. If I can do aught for you at home, you will let me know. Can I see Sparks for you? Ah! my journey approaches its end; I shall soon be shelved in America, away from these sights which have filled me with so many throbs; down to the bottom of the well I must throw the magic rod. Tell Crawford to write me. I rely much for my future happiness upon my friends in Europe. Don't let me lose the vision of Rome and of art! Who has ordered the Orpheus? I hope you have knocked away those books on which I stand. Reference to books carved under his bust. Remember me to Mrs. Greene, la petitePonto, Pasquali, A servant of Mr. Greene. and all. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
eed. Sir Charles Vaughan speaks of your kindness in the warmest terms, and of Crawford also: he has spoken to several of his countrymen of Crawford. I hope some gooCrawford. I hope some good may come of it. Maxcy, our Minister at Brussels, requested a line of introduction to you. He goes to Italy, probably next summer, with his family. I have also given him a line to Crawford. Item: I shall also give an introduction for you to my English friend, Mr. Joseph Parkes,—a solicitor by profession, but most extensively acwo or three weeks. Would that I could be with you! Do not fail to take him to Crawford. I sail from Portsmouth the 4th of April, with Cogswell, Willis, and wife, anncient banished man. Tell me every thing about art, antiquity, literature, and Crawford. You will hear from me next from Boston,—but not till I hear from you. Farewell! Remember me affectionately to Mrs. Greene, and to Crawford; and believe me ever sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Lord Morpeth. March 30, 1840. my dear
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
, whom he often visited at Cambridgeport, and with whom he conferred in plans for promoting the success of Greenough and Crawford. He much enjoyed his friendly relations with Rufus Choate, whose office was at No. 4 Court Street. They talked of polrd, —the Three Graces of Bond Street,—of whom one was to become the wife of his friend, Dr. Howe; another, of his friend Crawford; and the third of Mr. Maillard, now of California. In Philadelphia he received much attention from Joseph R. Ingersoll, society; but, after much debate and doubt, he has given up the plan. Yours ever and ever, Charles Sumner. To Thomas Crawford, Rome. Boston, March 31, 1841. dear Crawford,—You have, perhaps, already heard from Greene that I had started a Crawford,—You have, perhaps, already heard from Greene that I had started a subscription paper to procure your admirable Orpheus for the Boston Athenaeuin. The sum I proposed to raise is now subscribed,— twenty-five hundred dollars. I feel that this will not be an adequate compensation for the time, labor, and genius tha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
Sumner. P. S. Oh! I long for those verses on Slavery. Mr. Longfellow's Poems on Slavery were written and published in 1842. Write some stirring words that shall move the whole land. Send them home, and we will publish them. To Thomas Crawford, Rome. Boston, May 14, 1842. my dear Crawford,--. . . After I had completed my subscription for the Orpheus,—that is, after I had got all the names on paper that I supposed would subscribe,—I put the subscription-paper into a pigeon-holeCrawford,--. . . After I had completed my subscription for the Orpheus,—that is, after I had got all the names on paper that I supposed would subscribe,—I put the subscription-paper into a pigeon-hole without collecting the money, where it lay undisturbed, among other documents, till I was aroused from my slumbers by your most welcome letter of Jan. 4. . . . I read Greene's letters in the Knickerbocker with great pleasure. 1 fear that there is but little chance of any great change with regard to his consulate. Perhaps you are aware that I made an effort to bring about some improvement. He wrote letters to members of Congress and persons of influence in behalf of the Consulate at Rom
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
nterest which while abroad Sumner took in Thomas Crawford, whose acquaintance he first made in Romeser, May 8, 1844. Sumner's early interest in Crawford is referred to in Mr. Hillard's notice of thelection of expressive and original works. Crawford came to this country in the autumn of 1844, a 1845,—he bespoke Judge Story's influence for Crawford, who visited the National Capital seeking fropatriotism which American art has created. Crawford wrote to George Sumner, in 1844:— I am r and ever yours, Charles Sumner, To Thomas Crawford, Rome. July 16, 1843. my dear CrawforCrawford,—The moments pass, and I can only say that Allston is dead. He died suddenly, having passed a ver Boston. We liked him very much. To Thomas Crawford. Boston, Aug. 1, 1843. my dear Crawfoturned his mind to you. I owe you, my dear Crawford, more serious thanks than I can express—much e and the orator. All that can be done for Crawford shall be done. My great trouble is to find a[7 more.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
le v. Littledale, 2 V. 452; and in Higgins v. Crawford, 2 V. 571. In this last case, he was sole coe passed a few days in New York, where he met Crawford,—for the first time since their parting in Ro rising! He will be our President! To Thomas Crawford. Boston, Jan. 30, 1844. my dear Crawfelonging to Jonathan Phillips The Cupid of Crawford belonged to Mr. Phillips, and the Bride of Abr sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Thomas Crawford, Rome. Boston, April 30, 1844. my dear Crawford,—.. The Orpheus has been kept in a locked apartment all winter, waiting for genial spring, antiquity, and the friendship of Greene and Crawford, warm and instructive, shed choice influencesnd lapidary in its character. . . . To Thomas Crawford. Boston, June 1, 1844. my dear CrawfoCrawford, In the omitted part of the letter, Sumner forwards a commission on behalf of a Boston merchanA——there? If so, what number on Bond Street? Crawford will be with his mother, or happy in Bond Str[3 more.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
bbs, Charles S. Daveis, George W. Greene, Thomas Crawford, Edward Everett (then Minister to Englandful study of the matters he takes in hand. Crawford is already in Washington. Perhaps he will cae in art and letters. He is a warm friend of Crawford. Will Texas be admitted? We hear to-day te stored in the wallet of the past. To Thomas Crawford, New York. Boston, April 17, 1845. my dear Crawford,—Have you heard that the students of Harvard College have voted to request you to exePresident Quincy? The bust was executed by Crawford, and has recently been removed from the Colleks on it with the same feelings. It is, dear Crawford, most exquisite. When shall we possess otherability. . . . Ever thine, Chas. To Thomas Crawford. Boston, May 10, 1845. my dear CrawfoCrawford,—I suppose you have not yet received the letter from the students. I believe they postponed it t roof. The Crawfords and A——are there also. Crawford is making a bust of President Quincy, at the