hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 246 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 3 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 24 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John Milton or search for John Milton in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 8 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
together, came to the ground. My horse cleared them both; and I cleared him, for I went directly over his head. Of course he started off, but was soon caught by Milton and a parson, who had already made the leap successfully. I should not fail to commemorate the feats of the clergymen, as they illustrate the position of this boo is entirely lazy or stupid to obtain a degree. Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. Again in town and in this glorious apartment, where I look upon the busts of Milton and Shakspeare, of Locke and Burke, of Bacon and Newton! It was not long since I saw Bulwer writing here; and when he threw down the pen he had been using, the trke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough, and in the hall alternately played and sang. Quite early the family retired; but Milton, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed befor
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. Again in town and in this glorious apartment, where I look upon the busts of Milton and Shakspeare, of Locke and Burke, of Bacon and Newton! It was not long since I saw Bulwer writing here; and when he threw down the pen he had been using, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd admirers in America. But I let the goose-quill sleep. What a different person I have just been conversing with for thrhe church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts of Burke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough, and in the hall alternately played and sang. Quite early the family retired; but Milton, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting songs and stories abounded. I prize much all the opportun
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent ead Mrs. Marcet's little dialogues on political economy could teach Montague or Walpole many lessons in finance.—Essay on Milton. productions. I have met her repeatedly, and received from her several kind attentions. She is the most ladylike and moRadicals, to show that they were at least not ignorant of literature. Parkes wrote the articles on the prose writings of Milton. He is a subscriber to the North American, and has been much pleased with the article in a late number (for July, I think) on Milton. He thinks it the best essay on Milton ever written, and is anxious to know who is the author. I have felt ashamed that I cannot tell. Do not fail to let me know. July, 1838, Vol. XLVII. pp. 56-73. By Ralph Waldo Emerson. Jan.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
ns. Every girl, said Macaulay, who has read Mrs. Marcet's little dialogues on political economy could teach Montague or Walpole many lessons in finance.—Essay on Milton. productions. I have met her repeatedly, and received from her several kind attentions. She is the most ladylike and motherly of all the tribe of authoresses th and Montagu. It was established by the Radicals, to show that they were at least not ignorant of literature. Parkes wrote the articles on the prose writings of Milton. He is a subscriber to the North American, and has been much pleased with the article in a late number (for July, I think) on Milton. He thinks it the best essath American, and has been much pleased with the article in a late number (for July, I think) on Milton. He thinks it the best essay on Milton ever written, and is anxious to know who is the author. I have felt ashamed that I cannot tell. Do not fail to let me know. July, 1838, Vol. XLVII. pp. 56-73. By Ralph Waldo Emerson
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
at George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character everbus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milton as follows:— —if Vertue feeble were Heaven it selfe would stoope to her. The date is supposed to have been written by another hand. This autograph of Milton is described in the Ramblings in the Elucidation of the Autographs of Milton, bMilton, by Samuel Leigh Sotheby, p. 107, where it is stated that the Album was sold at auction, in 1835, for twenty-five pounds four shillings, and that it is now the property Dr. C., who took much interest in the account, remarked that it showed that to Milton the words from Comus were something more than poetry—that they were a principle of life. It has been supposed that Milton, by the alteration in the line from Horace,—using the first person instead of the third,—intended to express the perman
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
at George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character everbus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milton as follows:— —if Vertue feeble were Heaven it selfe would stoope to her. The date is supposed to have been written by another hand. This autograph of Milton is described in the Ramblings in the Elucidation of the Autographs of Milton, bMilton, by Samuel Leigh Sotheby, p. 107, where it is stated that the Album was sold at auction, in 1835, for twenty-five pounds four shillings, and that it is now the property Dr. C., who took much interest in the account, remarked that it showed that to Milton the words from Comus were something more than poetry—that they were a principle of life. It has been supposed that Milton, by the alteration in the line from Horace,—using the first person instead of the third,—intended to express the perman
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ay the treasures garnered up. In a small compass we have a survey of the whole field of poetry. We catch the far-off sounding voice of Homer; the graceful notes of Virgil; the plaintive, soul-distilled melody of Dante; the magnificent strains of Milton. To these, and the lesser votaries of the lyre, the orator has listened, and we feel the music of their verse in his descriptions. We shall only repeat what we have heard from various lips, that this production has placed its author among the mth, upon the mountains of Ararat. He went on in this way, running through all literature, ancient and modern, in the most extraordinary fashion, quoting from the Old and New Testaments, Aeschylus, Ovid, Virgil, Homer, Juvenal, Shakspeare, Donne, Milton, Spenser, Dryden, Statius, Cicero, Niebuhr, Tertullian, Aulus Gellius, Sir Thomas Brown, &c It happened that these remarks on The number seven occupied all the space that could be devoted to the subject of the article in a single number of t