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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. Sixteen months passed between Sumner's parting with his friends in Boston and his leaving England for the Continent; and a reference to matters of public and personal interest occurring at home may be fitly included in this narrative. At a meeting held in Faneuil Hall, on the day he sailed, Dr. Channing, Hillard, and George Bond denounced the murder of Lovejoy, the anti-slavery editor; and Wendell Phillips began his career as an orator by his reply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
s, and a capacity for receiving information from others. I need not say that he has none of the great attributes of Brougham,—his intense activity, his various learning, his infinite command of language. He regrets very much that ho could not visit the United States. Those of his suite who did, seem to have been well pleased. Gibbon Wakefield is going to write an article, pamphlet, or book, entitled Six Days in the United States. Calhoun made a great impression on Buller, and also on Mr. Phillips. Both of them speak of him as the most striking public man they have ever met,—remarkable for his ease, simplicity, and the readiness with which he unfolded himself. Buller says that Van Buren had the handsomest shoes and stockings he ever saw! I do not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Follett,—perhaps not so smooth and gentle; neither is he, I think, so ready and instinctively sagacious in a law argument: and yet he is powerful <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
s, and a capacity for receiving information from others. I need not say that he has none of the great attributes of Brougham,—his intense activity, his various learning, his infinite command of language. He regrets very much that ho could not visit the United States. Those of his suite who did, seem to have been well pleased. Gibbon Wakefield is going to write an article, pamphlet, or book, entitled Six Days in the United States. Calhoun made a great impression on Buller, and also on Mr. Phillips. Both of them speak of him as the most striking public man they have ever met,—remarkable for his ease, simplicity, and the readiness with which he unfolded himself. Buller says that Van Buren had the handsomest shoes and stockings he ever saw! I do not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker than Follett,—perhaps not so smooth and gentle; neither is he, I think, so ready and instinctively sagacious in a law argument: and yet he is powerful <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
daughter, who used to converse with me most indulgently in German. I trust you will pardon my apparent remissness in not sending you the books you desire. I have had a large packet of books prepared for you for several months, awaiting the opportunity of a ship from Boston to Hamburg. I have at last put my packet on board a ship for Rotterdam, with instructions to a commercial house in the latter place to forward it to you. The ship sailed three days ago. The packet contains a copy of Phillips on Insurance, two volumes; of Bayley on Bills, with notes; of the second edition of Story's Conflict of Laws; also a large collection of brochuresthat I trust will be interesting to you; also a copy of a new work, just published by a friend of mine, on Seamen, which the author sends to you with his compliments. I send two copies of the fourteenth and fifteenth Reports of the Prison Discipline Society; also of the Institution for the Blind. Let me call your attention to the wonderful accou
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
rganizer and agitator. Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman urged him, in the autumn of 1842, to enter on a more distinct cooperation with the Abolitionists; but his time for such public activities had not yet come. He had been for several years a subscriber for their organ,—the Liberator,—attended their annual Anti-slavery Fairs in Boston, and maintained friendly relations with their leaders,—manifestations of sympathy and goodfellowship which disturbed some of his conservative friends. With Wendell Phillips he maintained the friendship which began at the Harvard Law School. In Feb 1845, they discussed in correspondence the non-voting question. A brief reference to Sumner's view of the relations of our Government to Slavery may well be given in this connection, although a complete statement would be premature. The term Abolitionist, so far as its etymology is concerned, designated all who were in favor of direct moral and political action against Slavery; but, in the party nomenclatur<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
n will live. It will be a text-book for hundreds. Should you never do any thing else than you have now done, you will not have lived in vain. It must be printed and circulated through the whole land. There is great work for it to do. Wendell Phillips, passing the summer in Natick, wrote:— Finding that the Post is aggressive, and the respectable Daily The Advertiser. fearful, I know you did well; and I thank you for the good word you've spoken, though I've not seen nor heard it. Dhristian: but they were not disposed to insist that a statement of the argument against it should be encumbered with limitations and exceptions, recognizing it as most important that the lofty ideal of the oration should be kept in view. Wendell Phillips wrote, Aug. 17:— I have just got your oration, and read it immediately, of course,—glad all along that the thing had been done, and with an undertone of rejoicing that you had done it. As I closed the last page I could not help thinkin<