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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for David Robertson or search for David Robertson in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
robust, and wears a steel watch-guard over his waistcoat. He is neither fluent nor brilliant in conversation; but is sensible, frank, and unaffected. After dinner we discussed the merits of the different British historians,—Gibbon, Hume, and Robertson. Of course, Gibbon was placed foremost. There was a party at Hallam's after dinner; but I went from that to a ball at Hume's,—Joe Hume's. Sumner was invited, at different times, to dine with Mr. Hume at Bryanstone Square. You doubtless iman England. I think he adopted my view. Wishing not to claim too much for Prescott, I said: I presume you will rate his book as high as Watson's Philip, —though you know I place it infinitely before that. Ford promptly said: I place it before Robertson, and I shall say so in my article. He then gave me a sketch of his article, which he will begin by a description of the tomb at Granada; and in the course of it serve the Tory purpose of his journal by a comparison between the Great Captain an<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
civilities, though living comparatively in the same neighborhood. Hinc illae lacrymae. When you now read De Quincey's lamentations you may better understand them. A few evenings ago I dined with Hallam. He is a person of plain manners, rather robust, and wears a steel watch-guard over his waistcoat. He is neither fluent nor brilliant in conversation; but is sensible, frank, and unaffected. After dinner we discussed the merits of the different British historians,—Gibbon, Hume, and Robertson. Of course, Gibbon was placed foremost. There was a party at Hallam's after dinner; but I went from that to a ball at Hume's,—Joe Hume's. Sumner was invited, at different times, to dine with Mr. Hume at Bryanstone Square. You doubtless imagine that this Radical, who for twenty years has been crying out retrenchment, is an ill-dressed, slovenly fellow, without a whole coat in his wardrobe. Imagine a thick-set, broad-faced, well-dressed Scotchman, who has no fear of laughter or ridicul