hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 54 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Jared Sparks or search for Jared Sparks in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
as a substitute for recitations. The new Library—Gore Hall—built of Quincy granite, was rising. The Law School numbered seventy pupils; and Professor Greenleaf, sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial service, found himself overburdened with work. In literature there was new activity. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella, his first work, was winning golden opinions, and he was making researches for his Conquest of Mexico. Cleveland was writing the Life of Henry Hudson for Sparks's American Biography, and editing Sallust. Hillard was completing his edition of Spenser. Felton was preparing a Greek Reader, and translating Menzel's History of German Literature. Longfellow published The Psalm of Life in Sept., 1838, and a few months later Hyperion and The Voices of the Night. Dr. Lieber visited Boston to superintend the publication of the Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was gathering the materials for a treatise upon The Law of Evidenc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
on, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting songs and stories abounded. I prize much all the opportunities I have had of mingling in the sports and social enjoyments of the young men; because, on these occasions, I see them as they are without reserve, and thus learn their real characters. I have been trying to get a review in the Edinburgh of Sparks's Life of Washington; and a person of no little literary eminence, Rev. William Shepherd. the bosom friend of Lord Brougham, has written me that he will do it if Brougham does not do it himself. I have strong reason to believe that his Lordship will undertake it, and, if he does, his late efforts give us assurance what we may expect. Your trouble about the loss Sumner had been informed by Hillard of the loss of two of his letters from England, by a friend to whom they had been lent
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
on, in a distant wing of the house, had provided what he called a jollification on my account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting songs and stories abounded. I prize much all the opportunities I have had of mingling in the sports and social enjoyments of the young men; because, on these occasions, I see them as they are without reserve, and thus learn their real characters. I have been trying to get a review in the Edinburgh of Sparks's Life of Washington; and a person of no little literary eminence, Rev. William Shepherd. the bosom friend of Lord Brougham, has written me that he will do it if Brougham does not do it himself. I have strong reason to believe that his Lordship will undertake it, and, if he does, his late efforts give us assurance what we may expect. Your trouble about the loss Sumner had been informed by Hillard of the loss of two of his letters from England, by a friend to whom they had been lent
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
's not so bad a thing. His Lordship was kind enough to take me home in his carriage; and as we drove along, some three miles, we talked gravely of Washington and Sparks and Dr. Bowditch. I hope to induce him to write an article on Sparks's Washington in the Edinburgh. He had seen Bowditch's Laplace only last week, and was filleSparks's Washington in the Edinburgh. He had seen Bowditch's Laplace only last week, and was filled with admiration of it. He asked me, in his name, to present a copy of his forthcoming book to Dr. B.'s family, and to let them know the impression their father's labors had made upon his mind. I was happy in being able to tell him something of Dr. B., of whose life and place of residence he was entirely ignorant. Lord Broughamnow that he was Governor. I had a great deal of conversation about George III. and Lord North. Lord Holland confirmed in conversation all that he had written to Sparks, and which has been printed; and further said that he could have furnished much more from the same letters which would have illustrated the bad temper and spirit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
la fourchette, with some negus and punch. Punch! said Brougham, with an oath, that's not so bad a thing. His Lordship was kind enough to take me home in his carriage; and as we drove along, some three miles, we talked gravely of Washington and Sparks and Dr. Bowditch. I hope to induce him to write an article on Sparks's Washington in the Edinburgh. He had seen Bowditch's Laplace only last week, and was filled with admiration of it. He asked me, in his name, to present a copy of his forthcomSparks's Washington in the Edinburgh. He had seen Bowditch's Laplace only last week, and was filled with admiration of it. He asked me, in his name, to present a copy of his forthcoming book to Dr. B.'s family, and to let them know the impression their father's labors had made upon his mind. I was happy in being able to tell him something of Dr. B., of whose life and place of residence he was entirely ignorant. Lord Brougham is not agreeable at dinner. He is, however, more interesting than any person I have met. He has not the airy graces and flow of Jeffrey, the piercing humor of Sydney Smith, the dramatic power of Theodore Hook, or the correct tone of Charles Austin; b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
eillesse. I disclaimed for myself and the better portion of my countrymen any vulgar propagandism. He spoke of Washington with great respect, and inquired about Sparks's Life and Writings, and this new labor of Guizot. He requested me, on my return to America, to make the acquaintance of the Austrian Minister. After this recepr Heidelberg, whence I shall go down the Rhine to Cologne, then to Brussels, Antwerp, London. If I can do aught for you at home, you will let me know. Can I see Sparks for you? Ah! my journey approaches its end; I shall soon be shelved in America, away from these sights which have filled me with so many throbs; down to the botte I shall fondly recur as my springs of happiness. Are you aware how the French journals are discussing and eulogizing Washington? Guizot, by his translation of Sparks, Published 1839-1840. and particularly his Introduction, has given him great vogue at present. See a leader in the Journal des Debats about 15th November, and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, January 4. (search)
romised him a friendly welcome from you. I cannot forbear saying again that I think him one of the most remarkable persons, of his age, I have ever known. He proposes to stay in Europe two or three years more; to visit Germany, France, and perhaps Spain, as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. I leave Berlin in a few days for Heidelberg, whence I shall go down the Rhine to Cologne, then to Brussels, Antwerp, London. If I can do aught for you at home, you will let me know. Can I see Sparks for you? Ah! my journey approaches its end; I shall soon be shelved in America, away from these sights which have filled me with so many throbs; down to the bottom of the well I must throw the magic rod. Tell Crawford to write me. I rely much for my future happiness upon my friends in Europe. Don't let me lose the vision of Rome and of art! Who has ordered the Orpheus? I hope you have knocked away those books on which I stand. Reference to books carved under his bust. Remember me to M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, February 11. (search)
nd all my dear friends, with no little anxiety also to my future professional life. I shall wish to plunge at once,—that is as soon as possible—in medias res;but I anticipate mortification and disappointment, perhaps defeat. Still all this cannot destroy the stored recollections I have of Europe, of the world, of life; and to these I shall fondly recur as my springs of happiness. Are you aware how the French journals are discussing and eulogizing Washington? Guizot, by his translation of Sparks, Published 1839-1840. and particularly his Introduction, has given him great vogue at present. See a leader in the Journal des Debats about 15th November, and three articles by Saint-Marc Girardin in the same paper during the month of January. Also an article in the Supplement du Constitutionnel at the end of December; also in the National during January; also in the Revue des deux Mondes, for January. I write entirely from memory, and do not know if these journals are procurable in Bo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
was greatly interested in the literary work of his friends, Prescott, Bancroft, Sparks, Story, and Greenleaf,—all active at this time in authorship. Hardly a day pasico. It will be in three volumes, but will not be finished for several years. Sparks is in London or Paris, hunting in the offices for materials for a history of thmplete the work, bringing it down to the adoption of the Federal Constitution. Sparks, you doubtless know, has been in London and Paris the last summer, collecting mill go over Bancroft's ground; but they will hardly interfere with each other. Sparks is the faithful annalist, perhaps you may say historiographer, correct in his f 29. Your letter to Mary, with its pleasant sketch of Elba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archivo peak, and never finds the repose of a valley or a canter over a level plain. Sparks will give us an anatomy of history, with red sealing-wax poured into all the ve
April 29. Your letter to Mary, with its pleasant sketch of Elba, has come . . . . Sparks has just returned, laden with the fruits of his researches in the public archives of London and Paris. I dined in company with him yesterday at Prescott's. There were Ticknor, William H. Gardiner, Samuel A. Eliot, Palfrey, Longfellow, Felton, and Hillard,—a goodly fellowship. The conversation was agreeable. I envy you six months in Germany. I was not there long enough to learn the language as I wished. Another six months would make me master of it and of its literature . . . . Ever affectionately yours, Charle
1 2