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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 230 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 152 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 48 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 2 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 30 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Venice (Italy) or search for Venice (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ith ropes, old leather, and the like. Leaving Venice on the last day of September, after a week's vo! But I must be elsewhere. My next place is Venice, where I shall stay but two or three days or aIf you do not write me I shall have nothing at Venice to read fresher than Paul Sarpi or Paruta. No a day or two at Bologna, and five or seven at Venice. To George S. Hillard. Palazzo Giustiniani, Venice, Sept. 29, 1839. my dear Hillard,—Among canals, amidst the cries and songs of gondoliersgentle splash of their oars, from the isles of Venice, under the shadow of the Lion of St. Mark, I wl we be respected by Kings and Emperors as was Venice? All addressed her, even Charles V., as Incli me repeatedly: I called upon him once, &c. In Venice, I have letters to some of the first people: Iwrite him. It is something to send a wish from Venice to Canton vid Boston. It is equal to Pope's Wdear Greene,—I was thankful for your letter at Venice, and only regretted that it was not closely wr[7 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
be most cordially and heartily welcomed by all. Boston takes a sort of pride in you, and feels that you have done her honor abroad. Letters. To George S. Hillard. Munich, Oct. 18, 1839. dear Hillard,—The day after I wrote you from Venice I inscribed my name for a place in the malle-postefor that evening as far as Milan. We started at eight o'clock; it poured down cataracts: my companions, a countess, and an honest father with his son, a boy of fourteen, going to a school in Switt respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attai
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
ge for Vienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterday. You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's chara