Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Fletcher Webster or search for Fletcher Webster in all documents.

Your search returned 105 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
any question about it? The only practical point will be whether you will bring yourself down to the work. If your head can bear the transition, you will have no difficulty. You will only have to contend with the embarrassment of your riches. Joseph R. Ingersoll wrote, April 22:— It has given me great delight to learn, as I have learned from various sources, how distinguished has been your reception and how agreeable your career abroad. As long as gentlemen like yourself and Mr. Webster are the representatives of the country, we are perfectly safe in the belief that we shall gain largely in reputation, and in the hope that we may at length persuade the most reluctant out of their prejudices against us. John O. Sargent wrote, May 8:— Your visit has almost tempted me to envy you, for it has been flattering to a degree beyond any thing you had reason to expect,—the most flattering probably enjoyed by any American since time began. Professor Greenleaf wrote, Se<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
as the author of any book! Everybody is laughing at Willis's sketch, in a late New York Mirror, of Lord Durham. Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fury. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
as the author of any book! Everybody is laughing at Willis's sketch, in a late New York Mirror, of Lord Durham. Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fury. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
f a perfect master of it. He is engaged in every cause in the Common Pleas. In person he is short and stout, and has a vulgar face. His voice is not agreeable; but his manner is singularly energetic and intense,—reminding me in this respect of Webster more than any other person at the English bar. If you take this into consideration in connection with his acknowledged talents and his persevering industry, you will not be at a loss to account for his great success. I have been told that he wa Street. I should have mentioned, of course, before the Vice-Chancellor. He is about fifty-five and of the size of Mr. Binney, Horace Binney, ante, Vol. I. p. 125, note. with a bald head, and with a voice which in conversation reminds me of Webster's; in manner frank, open, and warm. He has disappointed the bar. I have communicated to several barristers the opinion you have expressed about him; but they all say he is a failure,—and these, too, are some of his most intimate friends. I may
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ren. We feel the inspiration of her history and literature, and are proud to claim them partly as our own. Her power we do not question. It was an American Mr. Webster. who, on the floor of the Senate of the United States, in allusion to her magnificent empire, has said that she has dotted over the surface of the whole globe werritory, for which it compensated the State of Maine by the grant of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars and the payment of the expenses of its civil posse. Mr. Webster, when assailed, four years later, with the charge of having failed, as Secretary of State, in his duty to his country, defended the treaty in the Senate in an ash representative, are associated on one of the most honorable pages in the history of diplomacy. The history of the question and of its settlement is given in Webster's Works, Vol. I. pp. cxxi-cxxix; Vol. V. pp. 78-150; Vol. VI. pp. 270-290. Sumner's article was well received in this country. It was reprinted in full in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
odore S. Fay. In 1842-43, Sumner intervened successfully with Mr. Webster, then Secretary of State in behalf of Mr. Fay, whose position wa should be sent to a school at Geneva, then attended by a son of Mr. Webster and other boys from Boston, of which he had, after careful inquind a half,—where I arrived yesterday. You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great riminal Law. Savigny, in personal appearance and manner, resembles Webster more than any person I have ever seen. He is taller, not quite so
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
dessa. At Linz took a carriage for Vienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterday. You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell toWebster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and GroteWebster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and true
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
well of its two conspicuous chiefs, Clay and Webster. On the other hand, he was repelled by the l. We have been upon the verge of war, but Webster understands our difficulties and the law of nrrison by his Cabinet. This was written by Mr. Webster, who is the soul of our Government. Harrisead of the latter event in the newspapers. Webster is the Atlas of the country now, and on his s5, 1841:— I agree with you entirely about Webster's massive and yet graceful letter. Letter of April 24, 1841, to Mr. Fox. Webster's Works, Vol. VI. p. 250. It is a chef d'oeuvre;and I do n do with regard to McLeod's release. I think Webster was right in that, and I regard this as one ohope to send you, when it is published. . . . Webster passed through Boston day before yesterday, oawrence both side with the Cabinet, and think Webster has made a mistake in remaining. Ticknor, whr, stopping at various points of interest. Webster regretted missing you very much; but he promi[1 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
he Free States, in which he complained that Mr. Webster's letter to Mr. Stevenson maintained morallThe paltry, uncertain, shifting principles of Webster's letter are unworthy of him. The question ofowe has administered with such success. . . . Webster's place in the Cabinet must be as uncomfortabson for this place; Ticknor, who is, perhaps, Webster's warmest personal friend; Choate, who has Weately; and I doubt if it can be compared with Webster's. You will see that Lord Ashburton has used tion of Channing, he would become a prophet. Webster wants sympathy with the mass,—with humanity, ould have written his Creole letter. Without Webster's massive argumentation, Channing sways the wue! Whose position would you preter,—that of Webster or Channing? I know the latter intimately; aand leaving it like a girdled tree. I bow to Webster's intellect: it is transcendent, magnificent.tual character than those that have come from Webster since he has been Secretary; and some of them[36 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Sunday, May 15. (search)
Sunday, May 15. Another night of sleep. I am a day older, with gray hairs shooting forth with startling growth. We dined at Prescott's at five o'clock,—William and Charles Amory, W. H. Gardiner, Dr. Robbins, and myself. There was a good deal of pleasant conversation. Mr. Webster arrived in town yesterday. I wish to see him about Fay, and to revive the old plan about Greene; but our public men are so lost in selfishness that I do not hope much. If I were a partisan in politics, I should speak as one having influence. We Hillard and himself. have read the proofs of Dr. Channing's second pamphlet. It is bold, vivid, and full of life-giving truths. I admire the power of this man. Of all moral truth he has an instinctive perception, and clothes it in an angelic light. . . . So I close this rambling scrawl. What care you for these minutes and fragments of life here in Boston? You now look upon the Rhine and its castled glories. God bless you! my dear friend. Get
1 2