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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 182 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 30 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for William Wordsworth or search for William Wordsworth in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 8 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
at the age of one hundred. I place her next after Lord Brougham's mother. She is seventy-five, neat, tidy, delightful in her personal appearance; and in conversation, simple, interesting, and agreeable. She affected me in the same way as did Wordsworth. I thought that Providence should have brought them together as man and wife. We talked of Scott and Lockhart. Was it not strange that I should be put to inquire at a dozen doors in that village, to know where Miss Baillie lived? In my vexae hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; and he pours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the affe
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
he pen he had been using, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd admirers in America. But I let the goose-quill sleep. What a different person I have just been conversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; and he pours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the affectionate good wishes of Basil Montagu. I have been amused at what was told me to-night with regard to my admission to the Athenaeum. I am an Honorary Member, admitted as a foreigner of distinction, a title which it made me shrink to see applied to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
k, with such a poet, of poetry and poets, of Wordsworth and Southey and Scott; and to hear his opini she has left behind. Rogers is a friend of Wordsworth; but thinks he has written too much, and witlong to write a sentence of prose as it does Wordsworth one of poetry; and, in illustration, he showed me a thought in Wordsworth's last work, Yarrow Revisited, and other Poems, 1835.—dedicated to in truth the Substance, we the Shadows,—from Wordsworth's Lines suggested by a portrait from the pen times over before he was satisfied with it; Wordsworth's verse was published almost as it first lefnybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. rst of a series of articles by De Quincey on Wordsworth. Poor De Quincey had a small fortune of eige humble country-girl in the neighborhood of Wordsworth; she was of good character, but not of that s. Montagu, herself the friend of Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Parr. Her letter to me, describing the[1 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
k, with such a poet, of poetry and poets, of Wordsworth and Southey and Scott; and to hear his opini she has left behind. Rogers is a friend of Wordsworth; but thinks he has written too much, and witlong to write a sentence of prose as it does Wordsworth one of poetry; and, in illustration, he showed me a thought in Wordsworth's last work, Yarrow Revisited, and other Poems, 1835.—dedicated to in truth the Substance, we the Shadows,—from Wordsworth's Lines suggested by a portrait from the pen times over before he was satisfied with it; Wordsworth's verse was published almost as it first lefnybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. rst of a series of articles by De Quincey on Wordsworth. Poor De Quincey had a small fortune of eigor hire. You know his article on Coleridge: Wordsworth's turn has now come. At the close of his are humble country-girl in the neighborhood of Wordsworth; she was of good character, but not of that
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
ir Charles's brother, Mr. Justice Vaughan. may have prevented his reaching there. If you see him there I wish you would remember me cordially to him, and if you can with propriety, say that I most sincerely sympathize with him in the affliction of his brother's death. His brother was a very kind friend of mine, and a most distinguished man. I have another English friend who will arrive in Rome very soon,—Mr. Kenyon, the ancient friend of Coleridge, and now the bosom friend of Southey, Wordsworth, and Landor. He is a cordial, hearty, accomplished, scholarly man. Rely upon his frankness and goodness. Ever yours, C. S. P. S. I am reading Herder's Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menscheit, one of the most difficult works of German prose; and the prose is more difficult than the poetry. To Henry W. Longfellow. Vienna, Nov. 10, 1839. dear Henry,—. . . I shall soon be with you; and I now begin to think of hard work, of long days filled with uninteresting toil an
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Nov. 6. (search)
Vienna, Nov. 6. No letter from you! Have you forgotten me already, or has the post miscarried? . . . In my letter from Milan I announced to you the coming of two Americans—Preston and Lewis—to whom I wished you, for various reasons, to be kind; also of Sir Charles Vaughan. Perhaps the recent death of Sir Charles's brother, Mr. Justice Vaughan. may have prevented his reaching there. If you see him there I wish you would remember me cordially to him, and if you can with propriety, say that I most sincerely sympathize with him in the affliction of his brother's death. His brother was a very kind friend of mine, and a most distinguished man. I have another English friend who will arrive in Rome very soon,—Mr. Kenyon, the ancient friend of Coleridge, and now the bosom friend of Southey, Wordsworth, and Landor. He is a cordial, hearty, accomplished, scholarly man. Rely upon his frankness and goodness. Ever yours,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
s essay could appear, which was headed American Law journals. It began thus: In a former number we considered the juridical character of the number seven; in the course of which we accumulated many, perhaps superfluous, illustrations of the prevalence of this number. To end this strange, eventful history, there are now in the United States seven journals devoted to jurisprudence; seven champions, we trust, of justice; seven burning candlesticks,—not seven sleepers. With the child of Wordsworth we may say, We are seven. In the language of old Piers Ploughman,— There ben sevene sustres, that serven truth evere. It would be impossible to describe the astonishment of some of the readers of the Law Reporter, at the appearance of the first article, which, standing by itself, was certainly a curious discussion for a law magazine. The editor was fully aware of this, and so wrote to Sumner. But it was extremely difficult to make him change any thing he had once written.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
d Felton, that I had not a moment of grace to converse with you. Do you remember that Dryden in his fables has translated several of the tales of Boccaccio? Sigismonda and Guiscardo,—Theodore and Honoria,—and Cymon and Iphigenia. Of these Wordsworth says, in a letter to Scott, I think his translations from Boccaccio are the best, at least the most poetical, of his poems. He has altered Boccaccio's names. One that is particularly admired as a noble poem, by Wordsworth, is Theodore and HonWordsworth, is Theodore and Honoria. You will find their character considered by Scott in his Life of Dryden. I cannot tell whether these ought to find a place in your translations. The sun shines cheerily upon my going. I depart in search of health. To this I have descended. Dr. Jackson still insists that my condition is very serious, and commends me to great care of myself. Perhaps he is right, and my future life to be that of a halting invalid. At the thought of this—not at the idea of death, for of this I am care<