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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
red him anew, not only as an artist, but as an expositor of art. I doubt if any European artist has ever excelled him with his pen. He cannot be forgotten in our history, or in the grateful memory of friends. His name will be an honor to his family, and a precious inheritance to his children. My sympathy at this moment I know full well will be of little avail, but the heart speaks from its fulness; I could not refrain. God bless you and your children! To Mrs. Lydia Maria Child, 1802-1880. Mrs. Child, by her intellectual and moral power, holds the first place among American women who took part in the contest with slavery. The only one to be named as her rival for that eminence is Maria Weston Chapman. Jan. 14, 1853:— Many years ago I remarked, more than once, that among all antislavery pens I found most sympathy with yours. The tone in which you wrote was most in harmony with my own mind. You will believe, then, that it was with peculiar satisfaction that I learned yo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
a friend of George, and before we parted gave me his card,—Comte de Kergorlay, Count Florian Henri Kergorlay (1801-1873). His brother, Louis Gabriel Cesar (1804-1880), was the friend of Tocqueville. a member of the legislative body. After the dinner, which was very simple, the Society proceeded to consider several topics of po Still suffering from My cold; kept in the house nearly all day. Dined at the Club Des Chemins de Fer, on invitation of Comte Treilhard; Adolphe Treilhard (1815-1880), a judge and councillor of state. about eleven at table. April 8. Went to Poissy, about fifteen miles from Paris, to see the cattle show. Kergorlay was to hnior was there, and our talk was in English. Afterwards company came, among whom was M. Élie de Beaumont. 1798-1874. He spoke of Dr. Charles T. Jackson 1805-1880. of Boston as having made la belle decouverte de petherisation. To this I said nothing. Sumner considered Dr. W. T. G. Morton to have a better title to the hon