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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 67 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for John Bigelow or search for John Bigelow in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
rk Tribune, July 29. George Ripley replied, June 8, 1849, in the same journal, to some criticisms on the address, and received a note of thanks from Sumner. This was the beginning of their acquaintance. Frothingham's Life of Ripley, p. 214. John Bigelow recalls that his acquaintance with Sumner began on this anniversary. It has been stated that Seward and John Van Buren were on the platform when the oration was delivered, and that they told Sumner at its conclusion that it was a Free Soil ad one can read it without feeling how great a thing it is to have and to be a friend. The young Hallam is preserved in poetic amber. I have mourned with the father in his second loss. Two such sons are rarely given to a single father. To John Bigelow, June 6:— . . . Mr. Ticknor's book is a good dictionary of Spanish literature; but, he is utterly incompetent to appreciate the genius of Spain. Sumner, writing to Longfellow from Montpellier, France, Jan. 24, 1859, said that M. Moudo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
, was brought before the same commissioner, claimed by a slaveholder from Georgia. The Administration at Washington, under Mr. Webster's lead, determined that this proceeding should not fail. The city marshal, acting under a formal order of Mayor Bigelow and the Board of Aldermen, in co-operation with the United States officers, surrounded the court house with chains. Sims's counsel, S. E. Sewall, R. Rantoul, Jr., C. G. Loring, and R. H. Dana, Jr., sought to secure the negro's liberty by wri of the Compromise measures, was a surprise to the people of Massachusetts. It was in conflict with the principles they had uniformly maintained, as well as with his general course as the representative of the State. See Sumner's letter to John Bigelow, May 22, 1850, post, p. 215. Still, Webster's efforts in Massachusetts in 1846 and 1847 to prevent slavery becoming the main political issue, and his lukewarm censures of the Mexican War, as well as his Creole letter of an earlier period, had
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
. R. Curtis, and G. T. Curtis; physicians like Jackson and Bigelow; scholars like Ticknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, him, That letter, dying, you will wish to blot. To John Bigelow, of the New York Evening Post, May 22: Only a week ew States. Sumner's letter was the basis of a leader by Mr. Bigelow in the New York Evening Post, May 23, 1850. reported by to act against it in the States where it exists. To John Bigelow, September 2:— You inquire about Eliot. Samuelll, and he has told me of his English pleasures. To John Bigelow, October 4:— Our Free Soil convention was very sp their votes; but Sumner would not give it. He wrote to John Bigelow, Jan. 11, 1851:— Whatever may be the result of ouraw from your treasures of experience and study. To John Bigelow, May 2:— I would not affect a feeling which I havalso Burlingame,—and all these stood out before. To John Bigelow, October 24:— I heard of your illness, while
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
D. D. New York Independent, April 30, 1874. John Bigelow came to dine with him; but John Van Buren, Works, vol. VII. pp. 307-312. He wrote to John Bigelow, Dec. 13, 1851:— Kossuth errs, all erow favor to the West; but Adams, as well as John Bigelow, while gratified with his success, objectedave earned your honors. Sumner wrote to John Bigelow, February 3: I am won very much by Ho work undone which ought to be done. To John Bigelow, February 8:— Pardon me if I say frankly you have done injustice to Story. Mr. Bigelow had in a review of Judge Story's Life and Letterm in France as his topic. Charles wrote to John Bigelow, March 26, 1853:— The post of assistawn soul would rebuke you if you did. To John Bigelow, June 9:— I longed to see you. When ynd be a speech for a book and for history. John Bigelow, of the New York Evening Post, who, though wn,—yeas nine, nays thirty. He wrote to John Bigelow, August 30:— The kind interest you ex[1 m
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
upported the Whig nominations, but refused to accept the Compromise platform as of binding authority. The New York Evening Post, conducted by W. C. Bryant and John Bigelow, supported the Democratic candidates while rejecting the Democratic platform. Thaddeus Stevens, in Pennsylvania, a Whig, while voting for the candidates of hiforts as an orator and logician. Sumner's hesitation in this respect gradually passed away, but not fully until his party came into power in 1861. He wrote John Bigelow, Dec. 13, 1852:— To-morrow for Webster! The eulogies in the Senate on Mr. Webster were delivered by John Davis, Butler, Seward, and Stockton; Sumner did not speak. He wrote later to Mr. Bigelow: The brave Southern voices failed on the Webster day. Badger skulked in the lobby; Clemens and Mason were both silent. The South would never give him their votes,—look for their voices. To-day has exposed the pettiness of the old parties in excluding Hale, Chase, and myself from committ
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
remont. In the latter convention, Stunner, though not a candidate, received a considerable vote for Vice-President, mostly cast by delegates from New York. John Bigelow of the Evening Post was active among the New York delegates, and considered that the formal withdrawal of Sumner's name by the Massachusetts delegation alone p. H. and J. T.) Furness from Philadelphia, the Barclays from Baltimore, Mrs. Wadsworth from Geneseo, John Jay from Bedford, Mr. Fish from New York and Newport, John Bigelow from New York, Parke Godwin from Roslyn, Mr. Pell from the highlands of the Hudson, Mr. Adams from Quincy, Amos A. Lawrence from Brookline, F. W. Bird from Walde to those who, like yourself, aided its birth, watched its cradle, protected its weakness, and sent it forth to conquer. Believe me with much regard. To John Bigelow, October 9:— Never did I expect this long divorce from my duties, which spins out its interminable thread. Constantly from week to week I have looked fo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
or. my own impression is that the emperor's superiority is found in his fixed will. His purpose is clear, and he is almost the only Man in this condition. . . . I tremble for Kansas, which seems to me a doomed Territory. How disgusting seems the conduct of those miserable men who thus trifle with the welfare of this region! My blood boils at this outrage, and I long to denounce it again from my place. To C. F. Adams, June 2, from Paris:— I have often thought of what the good Dr. Bigelow said when he postponed my complete recovery till next December; and I have had gloomy hours thinking that perhaps it would not come then. But my feelings latterly, and particularly for the last few days, give me hope. After a busy month in Paris he made a tour of three weeks in the provinces, which included Tours and the old chateaux of the Touraine; mettray, where he saw again Demetz, the founder of the penitentiary colony; Angers, Nantes, Bordeaux, and the Pyrenees. His sojourn in
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
o Neri, Santa Chiara, and the Duomo; Here Sumner was struck with the elaborate oratory of a Dominican friar. to the Royal Palace Here they met Mr. and Mrs. John Bigelow, of New York. and St. Elmo, ascending to the castle and descending by donkey; took drives to the tomb of Virgil and the Grotta del Cane; visited Herculaneum ll not return until I can announce myself as recovered, without being obliged to make any reserves. He remained in Paris a month, meeting there Bemis, Motley, Bigelow, and Joseph Lyman, and seeing much of Theodore Parker, Mr. Parker spoke at the time most affectionately of Sumner, calling him the great, dear, noble soul. W Pontorson. It is not likely, however, that Sumner put much value on the answers,—it being his way of making talk with the people of the country. He wrote to John Bigelow, August 22, from Bains Frascati:— You are wise to make a hurried tour through Germany, and then return to France. In attempting to get both languages, y
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
pponents, the Democrats. Others of conservative temper thought it would irritate Southern men without converting them, and perhaps drive them to unite their distracted voters or to resist the government in case of Republican success. Some who doubted the policy of the speech admitted Sumner's right to make it, in view of what he had suffered from the barbarism of slavery,—making a similar apology for a speech in the House by Owen Lovejoy, brother of the abolitionist killed at Alton. John Bigelow of the Evening Post, who was more in sympathy with Sumner's views than his associates Bryant and Godwin, wrote, June 27, that while appreciating the doubt whether such a speech might not inflame the hostility of the enemies of freedom more than the enthusiasm of its friends, he did not think a different treatment of the subject could reasonably be expected from its author. But Sumner had his own view of the historic conflict. To him it was no holiday contest, but a solemn battle between