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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
umilities to hide The work he did, the lore he knew? Was he not just? Was any wronged By that assured self-estimate? He took but what to him belonged, Unenvious of another's state. Well might he heed the words he spake, And scan with care the written page Through which he still shall warm and wake The hearts of men from age to age. This poem of fifty-three verses touches many points of Sumner's character and life. Sumner wrote to Whittier, April 11, 1849:— I have copied from Mrs. Jameson all that relates to Saint Mark and the Christian slave. This was the suggestion of Whittier's Legend of Saint Mark. I commend it to you as a fit subject for a poem. Under your hands it may become a lesson to our people. You will remember Saint Mark as the tutelary saint of Venice. Though an Evangelist, he was not one of the Apostles, but was, I believe, an early convert of Saint Paul. I missed you the afternoon we were to go to Cambridge together. I was sorry to lose the opportuni
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
ountrymen,—William C. Bryant, Professor Felton, George Bemis, Thomas N. Dale, and Mrs. Ritchie of Boston; and among English friends full of sympathy whom he met were Mr. and Mrs. Grote, Madame du Quaire, Madame Molh, Mr. and Mrs. Browning, and Mrs. Jameson. He wrote to Longfellow, July 19; My chief solace latterly has been in seeing Mrs. Jameson, whose conversation is clear, instructive, and most friendly, and in the Brownings; all of these have been full of kindness for me, and I like them aMrs. Jameson, whose conversation is clear, instructive, and most friendly, and in the Brownings; all of these have been full of kindness for me, and I like them all very much. In August he passed a day with the Grotes at St. Germain. Among French friends who came to him or communicated their interest were Auguste Carlier, He died in 1890, aged 87; author of La Republique Americaine. États Unis, and of different works on the United States, where he lived in the years 1855-1857. the Comte and Comtesse de Circourt, and Laboulaye. The last-named desired to know about Channing,—a topic always grateful to Sumner. Madame Mohl was his companion in a call a