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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 40 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 32 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises. You can also browse the collection for 1880 AD or search for 1880 AD in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 17 (search)
ry to India (New York, 1864); edited the Riverside magazine for young people during its four years existence (from 1867 to 1870); and published Dream children and Stories from my Attic. Becoming associated with Houghton, Mifflin, and Company, he edited for them the Atlantic Monthly from 1890 to 1898, preparing for it also that invaluable Index, so important to bibliographers; he also edited the American Commonwealths series, and two detached volumes, American poems (1879) and American prose (1880). He published also the Bodley books (8 vols., Boston, 1875 to 1887); The Dwellers in five Sisters' Court (1876); Boston town (1881); Life of Noah Webster (1882); A History of the United States for schools (1884); Men and letters (1887) ; Life of George Washington (1889); Literature in School (1889); Childhood in literature and art (1894), besides various books of which he was the editor or compiler only. He was also for nearly six years (1877-82) a member of the Cambridge School Committee;
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 18 (search)
d work, 1892; Facts and figures the basis of economic science, 1894. This last was printed at the Riverside Press, the others being issued by Putnam & Co., New York. He wrote also the following papers in leading periodicals: Is Cotton our King? ( Continental Monthly, March, 1862); Revenue reform ( Atlantic, October, 1871); An American view of American competition ( Fortnightly, London, March, 1879); The Unlearned Professions ( Atlantic, June, 1880); What makes the rate of interest ( Forum, 1880); Elementary instruction in the Mechanics Arts ( Century, May, 1881); Leguminous plants suggested for Ensilage ( Agricultural, 1882); Economy in domestic cookery ( American architect, May, 1887); Must Humanity starve at last? How can Wages be increased? The struggle for Subsistence, The price of life (all in Forum for 1888); How Society reforms itself, and The problem of poverty (both in Forum for 1889); A single Tax on land ( Century, 1890); and many others. When the amount of useful labo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 20 (search)
d,--I felt it shelter to speak to you. My brother and sister are with Mr. Bowles, who is buried this afternoon. The last song that I heard — that was, since the birds — was He leadeth me, he leadeth me; yea, though I walk --then the voices stooped, the arch was so low. After this added bereavement the inward life of the diminished household became only more concentrated, and the world was held farther and farther away. Yet to this period belongs the following letter, written about 1880, which has more of what is commonly called the objective or external quality than any she ever wrote me; and shows how close might have been her observation and her sympathy, had her rare qualities taken a somewhat different channel:-- dear friend,--I was touchingly reminded of [a child who had died] this morning by an Indian woman with gay baskets and a dazzling baby, at the kitchen door. Her little boy once died, she said, death to her dispelling him. I asked her what the baby liked,