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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 20 (search)
rd, and it needed only a glance at his photograph to see how truly the Puritan tradition was preserved in him. He did not wish his children, when little, to read anything but the Bible; and when, one day, her brother brought her home Longfellow's Kavanagh, he put it secretly under the pianoforte cover, made signs to her, and they both afterwards read it. It may have been before this, however, that a student of her father's was amazed to find that she and her brother had never heard of Lydia Maria Child, then much read, and he brought Letters from New York, and hid it in the great bush of old-fashioned tree-box beside the front door. After the first book, she thought in ecstasy, This, then, is a book, and there are more of them. But she did not find so many as she expected, for she afterwards said to me, When I lost the use of my eyes, it was a comfort to think that there were so few real books that I could easily find one to read me all of them. Afterwards, when she regained her e