Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Garrett Davis or search for Garrett Davis in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
many letters from him during this session. The senator's hearty satisfaction with the passage of this measure is mentioned in Dr. William Hague's Life Notes of Fifty Years, p. 165. The bill passed by a large majority. Its chief opponent was Garrett Davis of Kentucky, Sumner's antagonist in such debates, who expressed his disgust at the constant recurrence of the slavery question, and who could imagine no sight so dreadful as that of a fullblooded negro in Washington society. Sumner's promoti There is or ought to be a head to every body; and whether you will or not, the slaveholder and the slave look to you as the best embodiment of the antislavery idea now in the councils of the nation. The bill, which was opposed chiefly by Garrett Davis and other border State men, passed both Houses by a considerable majority. The President was understood to have doubts as to some of its provisions, and to hesitate in approving it. The cause of the delay may have been only to give the sl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
an of a very different temper from Mr. Sumner,—Henry Winter Davis, who was equally distinguished for his eloquence and his arn the correspondence of the state department became public, Davis reported in the House from his committee, June 27, a resolu topic of diplomatic explanation with any foreign power. Davis's report in full is copied in McPherson's History of the Re One incident concerning the resolutions—the assent of Garrett Davis of Kentucky to them in committee, notwithstanding the pn—is worthy of note. From the beginning of the Civil War Mr. Davis had been the most indefatigable opponent of antislavery m863, some pleasantry passed between them in the Senate on Mr. Davis's mentioning that Sumner and himself had been named together as Abolitionists. Congressional Globe, pp. 1376, 1377. Davis's sincerity of conviction was apparent in his manner and chours each day. The first day, all was confusion; and Mr. Garrett Davis said he would not sanction anything which had slavery<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
the United States. As usual in such debates Sumner was reminded—this time by Hendricks and Garrett Davis Davis said, Jan. 13, 1864, that Sumner, when he took his oath, had treason in his heart aDavis said, Jan. 13, 1864, that Sumner, when he took his oath, had treason in his heart and upon his lips. The same reminder came from Davis in the debate of Feb. 19, 1868, on the right of Philip F. Thomas to a seat in the Senate.—that he had been disloyal in his course upon the renditiDavis in the debate of Feb. 19, 1868, on the right of Philip F. Thomas to a seat in the Senate.—that he had been disloyal in his course upon the rendition of fugitive slaves; and he met the familiar thrust by distinguishing between refusing to play the part of a slave-hunter and joining in rebellion against his country. This session was signalize business. Saulsbury wanted one day without the nigger. Reverdy Johnson pleaded the absence of Davis, who desired to speak. A contest of physical endurance was at hand. The end was reached June 23, when, after Davis's speech, the Senate, reversing its former action, refused to save the Act of 1793,—some Republicans who had opposed its repeal changing their votes, and others not voting. The
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
two years rather than for the senator to leave a post he had held for ten years. Argument and protest were, however, of no avail against an inexorable majority. Motions to adjourn and postpone for a day were lost. Several senators, who regarded the change as a calamity, and had opposed it in caucus, felt bound to acquiesce at this stage. Sunnier and his Republican friends withheld their votes, and the negative vote was composed of the nine Democrats who had kept out of the debate. Garrett Davis said at the end that the foregone conclusion had originated at the White House, and there alone,—a statement repeated by Thurman. Bayard moved that the title of the committee be changed from foreign to personal relations. Sumner took no part in the debate, only making one or two remarks from his seat. The audience (a large one) was in sympathy with him, and applauded points made in his behalf. The same influences which swayed Southern Republican senators on the San Domingo question
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
A bill to admit free of duty materials used in rebuilding the burnt district of Boston, Dec. 12, 1872 (Works, vol. XV. pp. 258-260); December 13 (Congressional Globe, pp. 179, 180), a bill to purchase land for the new post-office in that city (Globe, p. 170). and pressed without avail his civil-rights bill and his bill to enforce equality in the schools of the District of Columbia. His last words for the session were on December 18, when he paid a tribute—one of his best offerings—to Garrett Davis of Kentucky. Dec. 18, 1872. Works, vol. XV. pp. 261-265. He did not appear in the Senate after the next day till the beginning of March, and then not to take part in the proceedings. He wrote to Wilson asking for pairs, and for deferred action on the flag resolution. Boston Journal, Jan. 9, 1873. At the special session which followed in that month he went only once to his seat, and then to present the credentials of Mr. Boutwell, who had been chosen to succeed Mr. Wilson,—leanin<