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Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 52 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 18 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley. You can also browse the collection for Fenimore Cooper or search for Fenimore Cooper in all documents.

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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 18: the Tribune and J. Fenimore Cooper. (search)
rking in the following epistle: Mr. Fenimore Cooper and his libels. Fonda, Nov. 17, 1841. cupied chiefly with the legal griefs of Mr. Fenimore Cooper, who has determined to avenge himself uappearing on Monday, (the first day of court,) Cooper moved for judgment by default, as Mr. Weed's c. Sacia made, at the same time, an appeal to Mr. Cooper's humanity. But that appeal, of course, wase her while she was suffering or in danger. Mr. Cooper, therefore, immediately moved for his defaulparte, Mr. Weed being absent and defenceless. Cooper's lawyer made a wordy, windy, abusive appeal fmstances, is a severe and mortifying rebuke to Cooper, who had everything his own way. The value of Mr. Cooper's character, therefore, has been judicially ascertained. It is worth exactly fon, Esq., having just arrived in the up train. Cooper will be blown sky high. This experiment upon Tribune may have an end. Our friend Fenimore Cooper, it will be remembered, chivalrously decl