hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 10 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
handed to establish the Bank of Commerce, and became its first president, stipulating that he should receive no compensation. What he did receive was his death-warrant. The dampness of the freshly plastered walls of the new building brought on in the spring of 1839 two successive attacks so severe that he could not rally from them. Still he toiled on, giving all his energies to perfect and consolidate the enterprise which he believed would be of lasting benefit to his beloved city. In October of the same year came another financial crisis. The banks of Philadelphia and the Southern States suspended specie payments, and every effort was made to induce the New York banks to follow suit. Mr. Ward was ill at Newport, but hearing the news he hurried back and threw himself into the conflict, exhorting, sustaining, encouraging. A friend protested, warning him of the peril to his enfeebled health of such exertions. I should esteem life itself not unworthily sacrificed, said Mr. Wa
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
y used in a certain way unravels confusion, in a certain other way produces it. Kant unwinds the silkworm's web, but Fichte tangles the skein of silk,--at least so it seems to me. Spent most of the afternoon in preparing for a tea party, cutting peaches and preparing bread and butter. Read 11th and 12th chapters of Mark in the Valley. At some moments one gets a clearer and nearer perception of the thought and personality of Christ than that which we commonly carry with us. Early in October came the move home to Boylston Place, leaving the Valley with great regret, but feeling more the importance of being with the children, as I draw nearer to them. Our mother had remained after the rest of us, to close the house. In Boston she had the great pleasure of welcoming to this country her nephew, Francis Marion Crawford, then a boy of twelve years. Born and bred in Rome, a beautiful and petted child, he was now to learn to be an American schoolboy. She took him herself to St. P
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
manhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women, without limit of nationality, may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient, and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it ought to be followed by immediate and organizing action.... Now, you, my dear sir, are bound, as a Friend and as an Advocate of Peace, to take especial interest in this matter, so I call upon you a little confidently, hoping that you will help my unbusinesslike and unskilful hands to go on with this good work. I
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
gher morality which at all costs protests against the legalizing of vice. Before leaving Geneva she writes:-- To Ferney in omnibus. The little church with its inscription Deo erexit Voltaire, and the date. ... I remember visiting Ferney with dear Chev; remember that he did not wish me to see the model [of Madame Du Chatelet's monument] lest it should givemegloomy thoughts about my condition — she died in childbirth, and the design represents her with her infant bursting the tomb. October found the travellers in Paris, the elder still intent on affairs of study and reform, the younger grasping eagerly at each new wonder or beauty. There were meetings of the Academy of Fine Arts, the Institute of France, the Court of Assizes: teachers' meetings, too, and dinners with deaconesses (whom she found a pleasant combination of cheerfulness and gravity), and with friends who took her to the theatre. To Palais de Justice. Court of Assizes — a young man to be condemned for an
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
too, on Friday evening. An omnibus party came out and a few others. I pounded the Lancers and some ancient waltzes and polkas, ending with the Virginia reel, in which last I thought my floor would give way, the young men stamped so. I have no paper left except some newspaper wrappers, so can't write any more. Got up and found this scrap, then hunted for my pen, which, after some search, I found in my mouth. This is what it is to be lit'ry. Oh, my! I sometimes wish I was n't! ... In October, while visiting Julia at the Institution, she missed her footing and fell down the two steps leading to the dining-room, breaking the ligaments of her knee. A letter to Laura makes the first mention of this serious accident, whose effects she felt all her life. Oak Glen, November 9, 1880. Dearest Laura Child, Behold the mum-jacket, sitting clothed and in her chair, confronting you after long silence, with comforting words of recovery. I am now in the fourth week of my infirmity, and
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
, and Scratchings of the Drift Age. The exchange was not effected. To Uncle Sam December 15, 1883. Darling broa Sam, I must write you at once, or my silence will expand into a broad ocean which I shall be afraid to cross.... I have had a very laborious year, now screwed to my desk, and working at timed tasks, now travelling widely, and scattering my spoken words.... Well, so much for desk-work, now for the witch broomstick on which I fly. The Congress was held in Chicago, in mid-October. From this place, I went to Minneapolis.... Harry and his wife are here, paying handsomely their share of our running expenses. The little house looks friendly and comfortable, and I hope, after a few more flights, to enjoy it very much. These will now be very short.... Boston is all alive with Irving's acting, Matthew Arnold's lectures, Cable's readings, and the coming opera. Pere Hyacinthe also has been here, and a very eminent Hindoo, named Mozumdar. I have lost many of these doin
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: seventy years young 1889-1890; aet. 70-71 (search)
try hard to have all the Far West represented at the Denver Congress. Thought a book or article about Fooleries would be entertaining and instructive. The need of this element in human society is shown by the ancient jesters and court fools. ... In Bible times Samson made sport for the Philistines. People now do their own dancing and their own fooling: some of it very dull. Query: What ancient jests have been preserved? The Fools of old and of all time would not be a bad title. In October came the Woman's Congress in Denver; she was there, attending all meetings and sessions. Mrs.----.'s paper on The Redemptive Power of Art was very so-so, and did not touch my conception of the theme, viz., art made valuable for the reform of criminals. I spoke of this with warmth. After the Congress the visiting ladies enjoyed a drive about the city of Denver. I went early to the High School with A. A. B. The Reverend Antoinette Blackwell. Found Mrs. Cheney speaking to the pupils
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
d still do some good work. Yes! my strong friend, my heart said, I will abide in thee, and a bit of the old Easter anthem came back to me, He sitteth at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father. No, it is a verse of the Te Deum. In October a lecture in South Berwick gave her the opportunity, always greatly enjoyed, of a visit to Sarah Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hame a spur, and this morning I have writ the President a long letter, to the effect desired. God grant that it may have some result! July 17. I despaired of being able to write a poem as requested for the Kansas semi-centennial celebration in October, but one line came to me: Sing us a song of the grand old time and the rest followed .. . This poem is printed in At Sunset. July 21. Writ ... to Mrs. Martha J. Hosmer, of Rock Point, Oregon, who wrote me a kindly meant letter, exhorting
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
of late that my strong love of life begins to waver. I should be glad to live to print some of my studies in Philosophy, and to have some of my musical compositions taken down by dictation. August 31.... The last day of a summer which brought a serious grief in the death of Michael Anagnos, who, ever since my visit to Greece in 1867, has been an important factor in my life. I am much troubled in the effort to compose a poem to be read at the memorial services to be held for him in late October.... A photograph taken at this time shows her sitting in her hooded chair on the piazza, her Greek books and her canary beside her, a serene and lovely picture. It was so she used to sit every morning. First she read her Testament, and a prayer of James Martineau, or some other good saint; this she called taking the altitude ; then she turned to her XEschylus or Aristotle. Before thus settling down, there would be a walk on the piazza, or along the highway. Sheltered by a broad hat
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
ubt if any of the compliments pleased her so much as that of the Irish charwoman who, mop in hand, had been listening at one of the side doors of the theatre. Oh, you dear little old lady! she cried. You speaked your piece real good! Late October finds her preparing for the move to Boston. I have had what I may call a spasm of gratitude to God for His great goodness to me, sitting in my pleasant little parlor, with the lovely golden trees in near view, and the devotion of my children 'cello, she was moved to give a performance of Flibbertigibbet. This occasion reminded her happily of her father's house, of Henry playing tolerably on the 'cello, Marion studying the violin, Broa Sam's lovely tenor voice. Now came the early October days when she was to receive the degree of Doctor of Laws from Smith College. She hesitated about making the tiresome journey, but finally, Grudging the trouble and expense, I decide to go to Smith College, for my degree, but think I won't do s