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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 267 267 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 92 92 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 52 52 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 43 43 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 31 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 29 29 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1871 AD or search for 1871 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 “Behold,” he said, “Life's great impersonate, Nourished by labor! Thy gods are gone with old-time faith and fate; Here is thy Neighbor. J. W. H., A New sculptor. After such a rush of impression and emotion, the return to everyday life could not fail to bring about a corrailway system of thought and good-will, penetrates every nook and corner of this country. Our mother was one of the first vice-presidents of the Club, and from 1871 to her death in 1910, with two brief intervals, its president. Among all the many associations with which she was connected this was perhaps the nearest to her hen the Chevalier called to pay his respects on his return from Greece, I am afraid of you now! There may be a fire-cracker under my chair at this moment! 1 1869-1871. He took the course of geology and mining engineering, graduating at the head of his class. Once out of college, it fared with the son as with the father. The <
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
iage and departure of the children, still another notable change was wrought, rather joyful than sorrowful, but none the less marking an epoch. Up to this time (1871) the wide, sunny rooms of the house on Beacon Hill had been filled with young, active life. The five children, their friends, their music, their parties, their ta For the tenderness of the one class is set by God to restrain the violence of the other. The New York meeting was followed by one in Boston. In the spring of 1871 the friends of peace met in the rooms of the New England Woman's Club, and formed an American Branch of the Women's International Peace Association: Julia Ward Hoch undertaking the cooperation of all persons is earnestly invited. Before continuing the story of this peace crusade, we return to the Journal. The volume for 1871 is fragmentary, the entries mostly brief and far apart. Written and blank pages are alike significant of the movement going on in her mind, the steadily growing d
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: Santo Domingo 1872-1874; aet. 53-56 (search)
cheer him on his way.” “Stood, then, no child before your door?” The Lord, persistent, said. “Only a ragged beggar-boy, With rough and frowzy head.” “The dirt was crusted on his skin, His muddy feet were bare; The cook gave victuals from within; I cursed his coming there.” What sorrow, silvered with a smile, Slides o'er the face divine? What tenderest whisper thrills rebuke? “The beggar-boy was mine!” J. W. H. We must go back a little to tell another story. In the winter of 1870-71 the Republic of Santo Domingo sent through its president an urgent request for annexation to the United States. President Grant appointed a commission to visit this island republic, to inquire into its conditions and report upon the question. Of this commission Dr. Howe was one, the others being Messrs. Benjamin Wade and Andrew D. White. The commissioners sailed on the government steamer Tennessee. At parting the Doctor said, Remember that you cannot hear from us under a month
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
occurred to me filled me with a desire to emphasize their wisdom by a really spiritual interpretation. From this time on, I became more and more interested in the religious ministration of women .. . Her first sermon was preached at Harrisburg in 1870. Then followed the sermons in Santo Domingo, and those of the Peace Crusade in London; from this time, the Woman Ministry was one of the causes dearest to her heart. The Journal from now on contains many texts and notes for sermons. In 1871, What the lost things are which the Son of Man came to save, lost values, lost jewels, darkened souls, scattered powers, lost opportunities. A year later: Preached in the afternoon at the South Portsmouth meetinghouse. Text, I will arise and go unto my father. Subject: The Fatherhood of God. I did as well as usual.... In the evening my text was: Abide in me and I in you, etc., but I was at one moment so overcome with fatigue that the whole thread of my discourse escaped me. I paused for