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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 52 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 34 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Carlyle or search for Thomas Carlyle in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
e genial over his wine, and was more natural than I ever saw him-after dinner we had coffee, conversation and music, to which I lent my little wee voice! We did not get home until half-past 11.... Annie has doubtless told you how we went to see Carlyle, and Mrs. was out, and I poured tea for him, and he handed me the preserves with: I do not know what thae little things are, perhaps you can eat them — I never touch them myself. This naturally made me laugh — we had a strange but pleasant ev almost well, and so handsome! the wrinkles are almost gone-Yesterday, Sir Robert Inglis gin us a treat in the shape of a breakfast — it was very pleasant, albeit Sir R. is very pious, and a Tory to boot. We had afterward a charming visit from Carlyle — in the evening we went to Landsdowne House, to a concert given by the Marquis — heard Grisi, Lablache, Mario, Standigl, were much pleased — I was astonished, though, to find that our little trio at home was not bad, even in comparison wit
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
the greatest pleasure in introducing a dowdy high neck, got up for the occasion, with short sleeves and a bow behind, to the most elaborate of French balldresses with head-dress to match, and leaving them to take care of each other the best way they could. As for the Governor [Nathaniel P. Banks], I introduced him right and left to people who had never voted for him and never will. The pious were permitted to enjoy Theodore Parker, and Julia's schoolmaster sat on a sofa and talked about Carlyle. I did not care -the colored man made it all right. Imagine my astonishment at hearing the party then and after pronounced one of the most brilliant and successful ever given in Boston. The people all said, It is such a relief to see new faces — we always meet the same people at city parties. Well, darlings, the pickings of the supper was very good for near a week afterwards, and, having got through with my party, I have nearly killed myself with going to hear Mr. Booth, whose playing i
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
This P. M. late Mrs. C. C. Perkins has recep. for Miss Carl Schurz. Girls going, but going first to X.'s weekly weak tea and weaker talk. Here again, you spleeny devil, get thee behind me! I love my fellow-creatures, but, bless you, not in this month.... Julia Nagnos takes tea round generally, and finds that it agrees with her.... I regard you, on the whole, with feeling. Farewell, Laura, I am your poor old mad March hare Mamma. Love to Skip and the little ones. April 7. Finished Carlyle's Reminiscences today. Perhaps nothing that he has left shows more clearly what he was, and was not. A loyal, fervent, witty, keen man.... His characterizations of individuals are keenly hit off with graphic humor. But he could make sad mistakes, and could not find them out, as in the case of what he calls our beautiful Nigger Agony !! I went out to the Cambridge Club, having had chills and fever all the night before. Read my lecture on Paris, which was well received, and followed by
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
stand at my head, in return for my letter. It is partly Backbone's fault. Backbone has been so scrouged and put upon by the summer's work that he sometimes cuts up amazing. Said work is pretty well out of hand at this moment, the last chapters of Margaret Fuller being ready for the press.... I have so much felt the shocking uncharity of things in the way of diaries and letters which have been published within the last few years. Not the least bad exhibition in this kind has been made by Carlyle and his wife. I have just finished reading the three volumes of her letters and memorials, which were indeed interesting to me by the mention in them of persons whom I myself have known. Still, the spirit of the book is painful. It is sad to see how she adopted, at times, her husband's harsh creed. I should think Froude, the editor, must be wanting in common taste and decency, to have allowed the letters to appear in all this crudeness. I am so glad that I never went near them, after
I, 270. Campbell, Dudley, II, 8. Campello, Count Salome di, II, 273, 285, 302. Cardini, Sig., I, 43, 44. Carignan, Prince de, II, 31. Carlisle, Lady, I, 85, 87; II, 166. Carlisle, G. W. F. Howard, Earl of, I, 81, 85, 88. Carlyle, Thomas, I, 84, 86, 172; II, 65, 85, 86. Carlyle, Mrs., Thomas, I, 84; II, 85, 86. Cary, Mrs., I, 159. Casino Theatre, II, 54, 68, 77. Catlin, Mrs., II, 179. Catucci, Count, II, 243. Catucci, Countess, II, 243. Century Club, I, Carlyle, Mrs., Thomas, I, 84; II, 85, 86. Cary, Mrs., I, 159. Casino Theatre, II, 54, 68, 77. Catlin, Mrs., II, 179. Catucci, Count, II, 243. Catucci, Countess, II, 243. Century Club, I, 258. Cerito, I, 87, 88. Ceuta, II, 234. Chabreuil, Vicomte de, I, 257. Chambrun, Marquis de, I, 239. Chamounix, II, 20. Chanler, Alida, II, 225. Chandler, Margaret, see Aldrich, Mrs. Richard. Chanler, Margaret Terry, II, 55, 57, 60, 65, 67, 174, 176, 202, 220, 224, 240, 243, 244, 253, 254, 303. Chanler, T. W., II, 303, 304. Chanler, Winthrop, II, 72, 94, 174, 225, 243, 303. Channing, Eva, I, 208. Channing, W. E., I, 70, 72, 200; II, 56, 57, 77, 108, 142. C