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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Historic churches and homes of Cambridge. (search)
ime came the troubles over Mrs. Anne Hutchinson and her heresies, settled by a synod held in this church. In 1636 Harvard College was established in Cambridge; for two reasons was it placed here: because the town was conveniently situated and because it was here under the orthodox and soul-flourishing ministry of Mr. Tho. Shepheard. Twelve important men of the colony were chosen to take orders for the college, and of these were Shepard, Cotton, Wilson, Harlakenden, Stoughton, Dudley and Winthrop. Thus from the first, college interests were closely linked to those of the First Church. Church and State were one in those days; Christo et Ecclesiae was the college motto. In 1638 Newtowne became Cambridge, and the same year the college was called Harvard. Its first leader, Nathaniel Eaton, for maltreating his pupils was dismissed, and for a time Samuel Shepard administered the college affairs. In 1664, however, Henry Dunster became president. He was a member of Shepard Church,
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), The river Charles. (search)
ns than hazard the fury of malignant adversaries who in a rage might pursue them, and therefore chose a place situate on Charles River, between Charles Towne and Water Towne, where they erected a town called New Towne, now named Cambridge. Governor Winthrop and Dudley had a sharp controversy over this, and Winthrop seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its righWinthrop seems to have had no notion of coming here to live; but we can have no quarrel with him on that score to-day, as we look across to the gilded dome and reflect that it is in its right place. There was a ferry at the foot of Dunster Street which served the colonists for twenty years before the Great Bridge was built. From the ferry a road led through Brookline and Roxbury into Boston, and whoever wished to take another route must make his way through Charlestown and across a ferry at Copp's Hill. That bridge cost a deal of money, and various expedients were adopted to aid Cambridge in her bearing of what was justly considered a heavy burden for the poor little town. Br