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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 11 document sections:

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ting the comfort and prosperity of the people dwelling here:— Oct. 28, 1636. The Court agreed to give 400l. towards a school or college, whereof 200l. to be paid the next year, and 200l. when the work is finished, and the next Court to appoint where and what building. Mass. Col. Rec., i. 183. President Quincy (Hist. Harv. Coll., i. 1), states that this foundation of the College was laid Sept. 8, 1636, overlooking the fact that the General Court, which met on that day, adjourned until October, and made this grant on the 28th day of that month. The College was ordered to be established at Newtown, Nov. 15, 1637, and the town granted to the Professor 2 2/3 acres of land, on which Holworthy, Stoughton, and Hollis Halls are supposed to stand. This grant to the Professor, made May 11, 1638, is defined on the record to be to the Town's use forever, for a public school or college; and to the use of Mr. Nathaniel Eaton as long as he shall be employed in that work; so that at his death
ist. of Newton, 50, 52. namely:— Rev. Nehemiah Hobart. Elder Thomas Wiswall. Dea. Samuel Hyde. John Woodward. Henry Segar. Thomas Park, junr. Daniel Bacon. John Spring. Daniel McCoy. John Park. Samuel Hyde, Son of Jona. James Prentice, junr. In answer to the petition of the inhabitants of Cambridge Village, on the south side of the river, the Court judgeth it meet to grant them a hearing of the case mentioned on the first Tuesday of the next session in October, and all parties concerned are ordered to have timely notice. Mass. Col. Rec., v. 188, 189. At the time appointed, a long protest was presented by the Selectmen of Cambridge, a part of which was printed in Jackson's History of Newton, pp. 53-60. Notwithstanding its length, it is here inserted in full, on account of the historical facts mentioned in it, and the picture it presents of the general condition of affairs:— The answer of the Selectmen of Cambridge to the petition exhib
e, that Mr. William Patten, Representative for the town of Billerica, being taken sick of the small-pox, while the General Assembly was sitting there, is since dead, and was interred on Monday last, the 5th instant. On Saturday, Oct. 3, the Court was adjourned to meet at Roxbury on the next Wednesday. Again, in 1752, the small-pox caused the cessation of study in College from April 22 until Sept. 2; and the corporation voted, May 4, that there be no public Commencement this year, and in October voted to have no winter vacation. The town appointed a committee, May 18, to devise measures to prevent the spreading of the disease, and on the 3d of October, voted that a public contribution be in the three parts of this town, next Lord's-day come seven night, for the speedy raising of money to defray the charges the town have been at in the support, &c., of sundry persons lately visited with the small-pox, belonging to this town. Also voted that the thanks of this town be given to the
esigned or declined to accept the office, the inhabitants of Cambridge utterly refused to recognize the official authority of that obnoxious body, and, like most of the towns in the province, instructed their Representatives, Oct. 3, 1774, to join only with the Council which had been duly elected by the General Court: To Capt. Thomas Gardner and the Honble John Winthrop Esq. Gentlemen, As you are now chosen to represent this town in General Assembly, to meet at Salem the 5th of this instant October, you are instructed and empowered to join with the Honble his Majesty's Council who were chosen by both Houses legally assembled in May last, and were approved, and are the only constitutional Council in this Province to act with them as an House of Representatives, or to act with the Delegates that are or may be chosen by the several towns in this Province, to form a Provincial Congress: to meet with them from time to time, and at such time and place as by them, or either of them, shall be
transaction of public business, and paid bills remaining on file is the follow-probably paid for the use of rooms by ing:— The Selectmen of the town of Cambridge to Ebenr. Bradish,Dr. March, 1769, To dinners and drink,£ 0. 17. 8 April, To flip and punch,0. 2. 0 May 1, To wine and eating,0. 6. 8 May, To dinners, drink and suppers,0. 18. 0 To flip and cheese,0. 1. 8 To wine and flip,0. 4. 0 June, To punch,0. 2. 8 July, To punch and eating,0. 4. 0 August, To punch and cheese,0. 3. 7 Oct., To punch and flip,0. 4. 8 To dinners and drink,0. 13. 8 Dec., Jan., 1770, & Feb., Sundries,0. 12. 0 ———— £ 4. 10. 7 John Jackson kept a public house near the northwesterly angle of Brattle Street and Brattle Square, probably from about 1672 until 1695, when he was succeeded by Capt. Josiah Parker, who purchased the estate in 1699, and was an inn-holder as late as 1725, and perhaps until he died in July or August, 1731. It does not distinctly appear whether Samuel Gibson was a
corner of Dunster and South streets, where he d. of small-pox, 17 Nov. The Town Record has October as the date of his death; but this is a manifest error, because on the 28th day of that month hx County Court, April 1662, Marmaduke Johnson being presented by the Grand Jury of this County in Oct. last, for obtaining the affections of the daughter of Ens. Samuel Greene, without the knowledge o chil. left London in the ship Defence July 1635, and arrived at Boston on the 6th of the next October. He res. successively at Dorchester, Scituate (where he was Constable in 1644), and Brookline 1646; 3d, to Margaret Boradile, or Boradel, 8 Sept. 1647. His children were Thomas, b. 1633, d. Oct. or Nov. 1634; Thomas, b. in London 5 Ap 1635; a son, b. and d. 1638; Samuel, b. Oct. 1641; John, 4 Jan. 1846; Susan Elizabeth, b. 28 Dec. 1847. Y. Young, widow, had a grant of land on the south side of the river, Oct. 1638. Her name does not elsewhere appear on the Records of Cambridge.
081, was a younger son of a wealth family at Earls-Colne, Essex Co., England, and came to Camb. in the same ship with Shepard. in 1635. He had buried his w. Emlen, 18 Aug. 1634; and he brought with him his 2d w. Elizabeth, dau. of Godfrey Bosville, Esq. (m. 4 June 1735), by whom he had Elizabeth, b. Dee. 1636; Margaret, b. Sept 1638. Roger the f. purchased the Gov. Dudley estate, at the N. W. corner of Dunster and South streets, where he d. of small-pox, 17 Nov. The Town Record has October as the date of his death; but this is a manifest error, because on the 28th day of that month he was reelected to the office of Townsman. 1638, a. 27; his w. Elizabeth m. Herbert Pelham, Esq., by whom she had several children. Though Mr. Harlakenden was young at the time of his death, he was much employed and trusted in public office. Shepard had known him in England and had received favor and protection from him and his family. Less than two months after his arrival here, he was elected
ntract, he entered the Cambridge printing-office, assisted in printing the first edition of the Indian Bible which was completed in 1663, and afterwards assisted in printing other books for about ten years. The current of his life did not run smoothly. He encountered opposition in his matrimonial designs, which he resented so highly as to bring himself within the grasp of the law. At the Middlesex County Court, April 1662, Marmaduke Johnson being presented by the Grand Jury of this County in Oct. last, for obtaining the affections of the daughter of Ens. Samuel Greene, without the knowledge or consent of said Samuel Greene, also being expressly forbidden her society, being a married man, hath often endeavored to draw her into his society, threatening the death of any other that should make suit to her,--the said Marmaduke Johnson, appearing in Court, confessed a part of the said presentment, and denied the other part thereof, which by evidence on file with the records of this Court ap
3 Aug. 1800, m. Nahum Stratton of Richmond, Va., 13 Aug. 1826; James Barnard, b. 26 Aug. 1802, m. Emily, dau. of Maj. Jonas Wyeth 9 Nov. 1828, and res. in Boston. James the f. was a merchant and spent several years in the Island of Tobago, where both his children were born. He returned to Camb. before 1809, and d. 8 Sept. 1828, a. 55. Reed, William, aged 48, with w. Mabel, aged 30, and three chil. left London in the ship Defence July 1635, and arrived at Boston on the 6th of the next October. He res. successively at Dorchester, Scituate (where he was Constable in 1644), and Brookline until 1648, when he bought a farm in Woburn. His chil. b. in England, were George, b. 1629; Ralph, b. 1630, m. Mary Pierce, d. 4 Jan. 1711-12; Justice, b. 1633, prob. d. young; and in New England, Abigail, b. 1635, m. Francis Wyman 2 Oct. 1650; Bethia, b. m. Cohn Johnson, 28 Ap. 1657; Israel, b. 1642, m. Mary Kendall, d. 29 June 1711; Sarah, b.——, m. Samuel Walker 10 Sept. 1662; Rebecca, b.——;
mmediately established here in the ministry. A large number of his friends and acquaintances either preceded or accompanied him, and purchased the estates of the first company, most of whom were about removing to Connecticut with Hooker. Mr. Shepard was thrice married, 1st in England to Margaret Touteville 1632, who d. early in 1636; 2d, to Joanna, dau. of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 1637, who d. 28 Ap. 1646; 3d, to Margaret Boradile, or Boradel, 8 Sept. 1647. His children were Thomas, b. 1633, d. Oct. or Nov. 1634; Thomas, b. in London 5 Ap 1635; a son, b. and d. 1638; Samuel, b. Oct. 1641; John, b. and d. 1644; John, b. 2 Ap. 1646, d. young; Jeremiah, b. 11 Aug. 1648. Mr. Shepard was one of the most eminent clergymen in New England. To his reputation for grace and knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ, is to be chiefly attributed the location of the College here. Such confidence was reposed by the General Court in his skill and integrity to discover and guard against danger, that they pref
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