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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 58 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 23 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies. You can also browse the collection for May, 1861 AD or search for May, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1858. (search)
is lively and constant interest in the malady and its development, his reassuring humor and cordial ways, never failed to win the confidence of the rough, warmhearted men to whom he ministered in the hospital, while at the same time they gave full promise of success among the more congenial associations of civil life. His faithfulness and his natural aptitude for the executive management of the institution soon brought him the principal control of its details; and a formal installation in May, 1861, as the assistant physician of the hospital, was but the recognition of services previously performed. Dr. Richardson was not a mere student. He preferred the business and activity of the world to the cloister of the scholar. The enterprises of industry, no less than the theories of science, interested him; and upon all affairs of public concern he held decided and intelligent views. He was cautious, but independent and fearless in his conclusions, ready, although never forward, in h
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1862. (search)
ion with God and the study of holy books, which must be scrupulously observed, for by these means the religious part of our nature is developed and a higher tone given to our whole life. When we look at a life like——, and consider that we are all of us living over again the same threescore years and ten, a feeling of weariness comes over us which passes away when we consider what lies before us,—the bright earth, kind friends, battles to be fought and won, and the death to be died. May, 1861. My dear father,—Knowing your patriotism, I was not surprised to hear that you had joined the Veterans. Dr. Peabody, in a sermon a short time since, said that the three principal causes of this war were, a general decline in virtue, neglect of the preliminary duties of citizenship, and a mutual spirit of recrimination and abuse. The first I think is vague, and in general all evils in society may be ascribed to a lack of virtue, and the last is a consequence of the second; for