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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
Chapter 21: Summer in England, Wales, and Ireland. three weeks in London. Two weeks of travel. meeting of the British Association in Dublin. When Mr. Ticknor entered on his second period of European life, he resumed his former ha two hours before, merely to see the hall. to hear the great debate of the session, the debate on the Church question of Ireland, in which the Ministry are to vindicate the wisdom of the resolution on which they turned out the Tories, and in which Son, and Sir John Franklin with others entered into the discussion about it. Professor Griffiths explained the geology of Ireland in the geological section, and Professor Sedgwick of Cambridge, Mr. Murchison, and other distinguished men in the same d. . Mr. Weld is a man of moderate fortune, much connected with whatever is distinguished for intelligence and science in Ireland, and author of several books and many papers in their Transactions; but his Travels in America was a youthful production
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
a mystery to me still. Things are in general very convenient and comfortable through the house, though, as elsewhere in Ireland, there is a want of English exactness and finish. However, all such matters, even if carried much farther than they aredid it with great regret; but our engagements with other friends in England would be broken by a more protracted stay in Ireland. So urgent was their kindness, as we parted from them, that we fairly promised to come back to Ireland, Note by Mr. Ireland, Note by Mr. Ticknor, written February 9, 1836: After an interval of six months I look back upon this visit to Miss Edgeworth with just the same feelings with which I drove away from her door. There was a life and spirit about her conversation, she threw herselpictures now in progress. Of the sketches, those he made in Spain are the most picturesque; those he has lately made in Ireland are the most interesting. . . . . It is evidently Wilkie's theory and purpose to find out what is striking and character