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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
he news had spread by the closing of the shops. Each man, when he heard that Washington was dead, shut his store as a matter of course, without consultation; and in ly at Mr. Thomas Peter's, who married Miss Nellie Custis, granddaughter of Mrs. Washington, whom you see in the picture of The Washington Family. They are both of t extraordinary occasion, regaled the delegates with a bottle of wine from General Washington's cellar, Mrs. Peter gave me an account of her grandfather's mode of life you may judge by the names of her daughters, one of whom she has called Columbia Washington, another America Pinkney, and a third Britannia Wellington. What famili dignified. Judge Marshall is such as I described him to you in Richmond; Judge Washington is a little, sharp-faced gentleman, with only one eye, and a profusion of of Maryland; the most distinguished being Mr. Charles Carroll, the friend of Washington, one of the three surviving signers of the Declaration of Independence, at on
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
I asked him about Washington's appearance, and he spoke of him very respectfully but very coldly, which I easily accounted for, because it was well known that Washington had told Hamilton that he could not receive Talleyrand at his levees, and Pichon had told me, in 1817, that he knew Talleyrand had never forgiven it. Among tives his reasons for not receiving M. Talleyrand-Perigord; and in an accompanying foot-note a letter is given from Lord Lansdowne, introducing Talleyrand to General Washington. The autograph letter of Washington to Hamilton came into Mr. Ticknor's possession through Mr. Sparks. But this naturally brought Hamilton into his thoughtWashington to Hamilton came into Mr. Ticknor's possession through Mr. Sparks. But this naturally brought Hamilton into his thoughts, and of him he spoke willingly, freely, and with great admiration. In the course of his remarks, he said that he had known, during his life, many of the more marked men of his time, but that he had never, on the whole, known one equal to Hamilton. I was much surprised, as well as gratified, by the remark; but still feeling tha
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
was accordingly arranged by him, and printed for private circulation, consisting of Mr. Haven's writings,—including two occasional discourses,—with a brief memoir, which is a graceful sketch of a life admirable for moral beauty, and for calm, intellectual strength. The 4th of July, 1826, the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of the Independence of the United States, was made memorable by the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the two Presidents who succeeded Washington. The coincidence of their deaths on this anniversary was one to touch the imagination and the feelings of the whole nation, and the sentiment thus roused found its best expression in the Eulogy on the two Ex-Presidents, delivered by Mr. Webster, on the 2d of August following, in Faneuil Hall, Boston, in presence of the City Government and the assembled citizens. A full account of the Eulogy, and of the scene of its delivery, written by Mr. Ticknor, is given in Mr. Curtis's Life of Webs
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
812, 2; dies 1821, 2; his appearance, 3; qualities, 3 and note; importer of Merino sheep, 3 note; marriage, 4; G. T.'s account of, 6, 7; feeling at the death of Washington, 21; confidence between him and his son, 22; letters to, 27, 28, 29, 31, 73 and note, 74, 79, 81, 84, 95, 99, 102, 116, 131, 141, 155, 172, 173, 185, 186, 189, rburton, 415. Warden, D. B., 142. Ware, Dr., Professor in Harvard College, 355, 356. Warren, Dr. J. C., Sen., 10, 12. Warren, Dr. J. C., 2d., 10. Washington, General, death of, 21; modes of life, 38; Talleyrand's feeling towards, 261 and note. Washington, Judge, 38. Washington, visits, 26, 38, 346, 349, 380– 382. Washington, Judge, 38. Washington, visits, 26, 38, 346, 349, 380– 382. Waterloo, battle of, 60, 62, 64, 65. Waterloo, visits, 452, 453. Waterton, Charles, 439. Watertown, 385. Watzdorff, General von, 458, 491. Watzdorff, Mlle. de, 467. Webster, Daniel, 5, 123 note, 316 and note, 317, 328, 339, 340, 345, 346, 348, 350, 361, 381, 382, 386, 37, 391, 396, 409; Plymouth Oration, 329, 330; let