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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
the subjects and books taught, to the money paid, and to the occasional remarks of the committee, nine out of ten of the members of which must have been originally educated in the schools they now control. . . . . I add for Mrs. Milman, with my best respects, a little volume recently printed by my friend Mr. Longfellow, asking her not to omit the Preface. Mr. Longfellow is just gone to the Rhine, to try to mend his health in some of its baths, and when he stops in London a few days next October, I will take the liberty to tell him he may call on you in my name, if you happen to be in town. He is a most amiable and agreeable person, of whom we are all very fond. Mrs. Ticknor desires her kind regards may be given to Mrs. Milman and yourself. Very faithfully yours, George Ticknor. To Count Adolphe de Circourt, Paris. Boston, May 30, 1842. my dear Count Circourt,—In your very kind and most agreeable letter, written last February, you ask me to write to you on the politica
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
as Congress quarrels about the extension of slavery, so long there can be no government in California, and every man will do what seems good in his own eyes; a state of things that does not promise an advance in civilization. Indeed, in any event, it will be a curse to most persons who go there; perhaps to the world. . . . . Yours always, G. T. To Horatio Greenough, Esq. Boston, December 15, 1849. My dear Mr. Greenough,—I received, a short time since, your kind letter written in October, announcing to me that you had shipped for Boston a bas-relief, which you destine for me. The history of this bas-relief is interesting, and creditable to both parties. In Mr. Greenough's youth, Mr. Ticknor, and other gentlemen who withheld their names, enabled the young sculptor to go to Italy and pursue his art, doing it partly by direct assistance, and partly by such assurances as inspired him with confidence in times of difficulty and depression. Knowing no one in the matter but Mr
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
uscapie. Young Prescott has returned lately, and brought me the fine copies of Ayllon's Cid, 1579, and of the Toledana Discreta, 1604, which you intrusted to his care. His father came at the same time, and both of them are quite well, and much gratified by the kindness they everywhere received in Europe . . . . I continue to receive much better accounts of my book from Europe than I can think it deserves. . . . . You will, I suppose, have had Ford's review in the London Quarterly for October, and that of Rossieuw de St. Hilaire in the Revue des Deux Mondes at Paris. Julius is going on vigorously with his translation at Hamburg, assisted, as he writes me, by notes from Wolf of Vienna and Huber of Berlin, and expecting to publish at New Year. Tieck writes with much kindness about it. Villemain has volunteered to me a message of approbation and thanks; and I enclose you a letter from Humboldt, found in a newspaper, of which I know nothing else, not even to whom it was addressed
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
s much as they did in the Creation . . . . Yours very sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart., Fredericton, N. B. Sir Edmund Head was, at this time, Governor of New Brunswick. He and Lady Head had paid a visit to Boston in October, and he wrote thus to Mr. Ticknor afterwards: Sir Charles Lyell says of Mr. Prescott, Prescott's visit has been a source of great pleasure to us, and, though I can by no means sympathize with MacAULAYulay's astonishment that, being what he is, h, and which I wish you—if it be consistent with your other arrangements in the United States—to secure for yourself; I mean the period for lecturing. He has the first course of the season; it is usually the time when we have the finest weather,—October and November,—and the audiences are fresh and eager. Please think of this. It is a matter of somewhat more consequence than it was when you were here before, because lectures of all kinds are less run after. Three full, large audiences, howe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ome to us at last, as surely as the great Gulf Stream goes from our shores to yours, and then turns back to begin its course anew from the point whence it started. And steam is every day bringing us nearer together, and making us more dependent on each other. Notwithstanding all you may hear in Europe, there is no prospect that the United States will involve themselves in the present troubles of your part of the world. The apprehension of it that was felt in London, in the latter part of October, was very absurd; and I am happy to be able to add that the indiscreet bullying of the Times newspaper produced no effect at all on our population, which has often been so very sensitive to such things . . . . The Nicaragua matter—the claim of the British government to certain rights in the Bay of Honduras—is a matter which may be much complicated by diplomacy, and draw long consequences after it. But the obvious trouble, and the one that can be most easily turned to account, is the attempt
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
years, since the publication of this valuable Catalogue. Being now at ease about that which he considered as not only the first, but, in our social condition, the most valuable part of the Library, Mr. Ticknor began to give proof that his instincts as a scholar were only held in abeyance by his judgment as a citizen. In April, 1860, he gave to the Library 2,400 volumes of works of such a high character that he made it a condition that two thousand of them should not circulate, and in October of the same year he presented to it one hundred and forty-three volumes, forming a special collection on Moliere, with similar restrictions; while in October, 1864, he gave one hundred and sixty volumes of Provencal literature, under still more stringent conditions. In 1861, also, being consulted as to the conditions to be attached to a bequest of money to the Library, he reverted to an idea, entertained by him long before, which was adopted, and the income was required to be expended for
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
hem very kind. Like true Germans, they take us up just where they left us. This I say, thinking of Dresden; but at Berlin it was the same, and so it will be, I am sure, wherever we go in Germany, for the Germans are an eminently faithful people. We all feel a little sorry and troubled at leaving Dresden. . . . . But the autumn is coming on, and we shall find milder skies and brighter days at the South. We set off, therefore, to-morrow for Vienna, hoping to be in Venice by the middle of October, and before Rome by December 1 . . . . . Give my best love to dear Lizzie. I am delighted to hear that she is so well. Let her keep gaining till I see her. Yours very affectionately, Geo. Ticknor To Mrs. W. S. Dexter. Milan, October 26, 1856. Dearest Lizzie,—I thank your husband, through you, for a very kind and interesting letter that I received from him a few days ago, dated October 7. He writes to me always on important matters, which are rarely touched upon by my other
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
Head, having no engagements from August 5 to September. We shall arrange our affairs so as to go to Gorham, whenever Lady Head advises us that she shall be glad to have us come. It is a good while since I have been in that country, and I shall enjoy it very much; and besides that, I think I shall find it salutary. Since the last winter and spring, when I was a little overworked and run down, I find a tonic atmosphere very useful. . . . . Certainly We shall be at home all the month of October, . . . . and count very much upon your visit. Pray make it as long as you can. . I shall be glad to have Garibaldi succeed; but I do not see how all the Italian questions, which seem to be getting more and more complicated every day, are to be peaceably solved. Venice cannot remain as it is, and yet the rest of Italy be made quiet; the Pope will not give up; the Emperor cannot depose him, or permit revolution to go further in Italy than it has gone. In short, it is much like the old c