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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 285 285 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 67 67 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 34 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 27 27 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 26 26 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1855 AD or search for 1855 AD in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
t the full moon everybody will go on the river, I think, to see it. We went repeatedly. From Niagara we went to Geneseo, and passed three or four sad days with our friend Mrs. William W. Wadsworth, whose husband died after six years illness, while we were at Niagara. The beauty of everything without, and the luxury, finish, exactness, of everything within, contrasted strongly with the noiseless stillness of a house of death . . . . Here, again,—Lake George, In the years from 1851 to 1855, inclusive, Mr. Ticknor and his family passed a part of each summer on the shores of this lovely lake.—is another contrast to the rushing glories of Niagara, for the beautiful, quiet lake is always before us, and nearly every one of our pleasures is connected with it. Agreeable people, however, we have in the house, several fixtures, the same we had last year,—Dr. Beck, the author of the book on legal medicine; Dr. Campbell, the popular preacher in Albany; and two or three others, . . . . wit<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
done, in the course of which Mr. Ticknor had a report, of the facts ascertained during the day, brought to him every evening, sometimes as late as eleven o'clock. A new and unexpected reason for confidence appeared now, in the evidence that most people resorting to the Library desired very much to obtain some book, but were not so anxious to get one particular book that they would complain of missing it, if they got something to read. This was unlooked for and reassuring. Although after 1855 Mr. C. C. Jewett, an accomplished bibliographer and librarian, was much employed in the practical labors of the new Library, yet, until the office of superintendent was created and Mr. Jewett established in it, in 1858, Mr. Ticknor continued very constantly and often absorbingly occupied with its duties. Mr. Everett was unable to give much time to the interests of the Library, and repeatedly wished to resign, calling himself only a parade officer; but at Mr. Ticknor's constant urgency he r
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
gagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we are just come back from Savage's, Mr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical result, however, of the whole is, that we have had an uncommonly pleasant summer,—generally a gay one for old folks,—and that we are now in excellent health, gathered comfortably to our own hearthstone, with good pluck to encounter a New England winter, which the two Annas like less than I do. Touching the Prince's visit,—of which you speak inquiringly,—I think you know just about as much as I do . . . . Ev
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
ath of my poor sister. My answer to your last letter seemed not yet to have reached you, and I am uncertain if it was written before or after this lamentable event. I thank you heartily for the part you take in my sorrow, and for all you say on account of the dear departed. It was for me, and for us all, a great loss; for me particularly, as she was the last of my brothers and sisters. She has left, in the whole country, a very good memory. Her last years were very retired. In the year 1855 she had submitted to an operation for cataract, which relieved her at least of the almost complete blindness which was her fate. She could again write and read, but at a certain distance her eye—the one was entirely lost— was very feeble. Since this time she had abandoned her authorship. The political situation of the last period, since 1866, preoccupied her much, and I believe that the war of this summer has much contributed to abridge her life. Yet her death was a very gentle one. She