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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 78 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Joshua Bates or search for Joshua Bates in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 8 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
), to pass a couple of days there; and then went to Sir Francis Doyle's, whom I found much changed, by severe and long-continued disease, but still with the same distingue, gentlemanlike air he had when I knew him three years ago. I dined with Bates, the banker. Van De Weyer, Soon afterwards Mr. Bates's son-in-law. the Belgian Minister, was there,—an acute and pleasant person, talking English almost perfectly well,—and Murray, formerly secretary to Lord Lyndhurst, and now the Secretary oMr. Bates's son-in-law. the Belgian Minister, was there,—an acute and pleasant person, talking English almost perfectly well,—and Murray, formerly secretary to Lord Lyndhurst, and now the Secretary of the great Ecclesiastical Commission, —a very good scholar and a very thorough Tory, who talks with some brilliancy and effect. In the evening I had an engagement to go to Lord Holland's, who is now passing a few days at his luxurious establishment in South Street. I found there Lord Albemarle, Pozzo di Borgo, Lord Melbourne, the Sardinian Minister, Young Ellice and his beautiful. highbred wife, Allen, and some others. Pozzo di Borgo was brilliant, and Lady Holland disagreeable. Lord
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
country, to look it over, and if he finds it what he expects to find it, to give it to some person who understands Spanish literature, to make an article about it . . . . . This is a good deal, and it is still more that he was really good-humored about it . . . . . It was a pleasant time with such people, but we did not stay late; and when we left, I took Sedgwick to the Athenaeum, and there bade him farewell with much regret. He goes to Cambridge to-morrow. May 30.—. . . . A party at Mr. Bates's, entirely American, except Baron Stockmar, a Saxon, formerly confidential secretary to Prince Leopold, now much about the Queen. I had him pretty much to myself, and found him very acute, and full of knowledge. He talks English almost like a native. May 31.—We breakfasted, by very especial invitation, with Rogers, in order to look over his pictures, curiosities, etc.; and therefore nobody was invited to meet us but Miss Rogers and the Milmans. We had a three-hours' visit of it, fr
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
gara. To John Kenyon, Eeq., London. March 30, 1845. . . . . With the February packet came a codicil to your kindness, again most delightful, for which we owe you more thanks. How can we render them? Come and see. Here are the Lyells coming a second time, nothing daunted by their first experiment. The steam packets will bring you almost to our door; and when you are once here, you can judge of the soundness of your American investments, a great deal better than you can even through Bates's wide correspondence and painstaking judgment, for the whole depends upon the character of the people. This you may think is a bold remark in me just now, when you are thinking so ill of us, for electing Polk President, and taking measures to annex Texas. But it is true, nevertheless. You have nothing else to depend upon, as far as you are a holder of American funds, but the moral sense of the people who are indebted to you. The only question is, have they enough of this wisdom and hones
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
y is getting on, but will hardly be opened till after your return. The Boston Public Library, of which an account will be given in the next chapter. I wrote a strong letter to Mr. T. W. Ward—in New York a fortnight or more ago, about funding Mr. Bates's donation, and reserving the income to purchase books of permanent value; which he sent to Mr. Bates, confirming it strongly. I added that your opinion coincided with mine. So I hope that will be rightly settled. . . . . Yours sincerelyMr. Bates, confirming it strongly. I added that your opinion coincided with mine. So I hope that will be rightly settled. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head, Fredericton. Boston, December 20, 1852. My dear Sir Edmund,—I am much struck with what you say about the ignorance that prevails in England concerning this country and its institutions, and the mischief likely to spring from it. Indeed, it is a subject which has for some time lain heavy on my thoughts: not that I am troubled about any ill — will felt in England towards the United States, for I believe there never was so little of it; but that, from Pu<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
d purchasing books for the Library. When Mr. Bates's munificence came, like a great light shiniom November, 1852, till May, 1854. Before Mr. Bates's offer of his first great donation was rece half that elapsed between the first news of Mr. Bates's intentions and the opening of the little lere received two letters to this effect from Mr. Bates, and one from Mr. Everett enclosing what he d unsettled, no time was lost with regard to Mr. Bates's new donations. Mr. Ticknor immediately be preparing the lists that were to be sent to Mr. Bates. These lists, embracing above forty thousansuccessively forwarded, and were approved by Mr. Bates, who had in these matters the invaluable advondon, he remained there three weeks, seeing Mr. Bates constantly, and conferring with him and M. Visive as quiet. In a letter written after Mr. Bates's death, Mr. Ticknor says of him: To me he wonsul of the United States, is our agent and Mr. Bates's, and he has associated with himself Dr. Pi[14 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
tz family with them,—and in the evening go to the Horners'. . . . . I am just setting out for Bates's and the British Museum, so as to begin work first of all. How much there will be of it, or whaisure to-day. I left off my hurried despatch just as I was going out . . . . I drove first to Mr. Bates's. He is not in town, was the answer of the bowing porter. I was a little disappointed not toherry, and enjoyed my dinner, I assure you . . . . July 11.—I breakfasted tete-á--tete with Mr. Bates, and had a long and very satisfactory conversation with him about the Library. Then I went to. . . . . I am very busy. I have nearly got through with everything I wish to discuss with Mr. Bates, who continues to entertain most generous purposes towards the Library; and I have done a good a good rest . . . . At half past 8 or nine o'clock—for it comes to that nowadays—I dined with Mr. Bates, and met Sparks and his wife, Cary,—a sensible M. P.,—Sir Gore Ouseley and Lady Ouseley,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
t want to have you troubled as well as myself, especially as you could not give me counsel. The difficulty has been about getting an agent. . . . . I shall see Mr. Bates, and I trust settle everything by the end of the week. If I do, it will be a considerable weight off my mind. . . . . Lord Palmerston and Lord Clarendon bothell, and so had a very good time. Whewell grows squarer and more Bishop-like than ever. . . . . July 31.—A busy day, and a long one. At half past 8 I was at Mr. Bates's, and at half past 9 had settled everything with him. . . . . I breakfasted with the Heads, and had a most agreeable time. There are no pleasanter people in Loter going home, a good talk till eleven o'clock. August 4.—. . . . I drove to the Barings', in the depths of the city, . . . . saw the gentlemen there,—except Mr. Bates, who is at Dover,—adjusted my money affairs, and, hastening to the London Bridge Station, came down to Mildmay's at Shoreham, in a thoroughly hot, disagreeable,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
as, I. 411, II. 324. Barker, Dr., Fordyce, II. 463. Barnard, Mr., I. 459. Barolo, Marchesa, II. 40, 41. Barolo, Marchese, II. 38, 40, 41, 42. Barrett, Elizabeth, II. 146 and note. Barthelemy, E., II. 131. Barthelemy-Saint-Hilaire, Jules, II. 119. Bartlett, Sidney, II. 93 note, 445 note. Bartolini, Lorenzo, II. 55. Barton Library, II. 488 and note. Barton, Mrs. Thomas P., II. 488 and note. Bassano, Duc de, II. 131. Bastard, Count, II. 125, 137, 138. Bates, Joshua, II. 149, 179, 284, 305 and note, 306, 309, 310, 311 and note, 312, 317, 358, 365, 366, 372, 387. Baudissin, Count, I. 467, 468, 473 and note, 475, 476, 482, 491. Baudissin, Countess, I. 467. Bauer, Mademoiselle, I. 469, 478 and note. Bavaria, Crown Prince of (Ludwig I.), I. 177. Beaufort, Lady, II. 385. Beaumont, Elie de, II. 125. Beaumont, Gustave de, I. 421. Beauvillers, M., I. 122. Becchi, II. 53. Becher, Lady, II. 371. See O'Neil, Miss. Beck, Dr., Professo