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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 58 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 7 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Cooper or search for Cooper in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
and well-arranged parlor, sitting in his arm-chair, with a sort of comforter of silk thrown about the lower part of his person. His infirmities were plainly upon him, but there was nothing or very little that was painful in their character. He talked with great distinctness of opinion and phrase upon a wide variety of subjects; such as the different races of men in the early ages of the world, the impossibility of two races becoming mixed on equal terms, the state of Canada at this moment, Cooper's novels, etc. He says he is, though entirely liberal in his politics, less inclined to republican, or democratic, institutions than he used to be, because he thinks the people are, from the tendencies of their nature, less disposed to choose the most elevated minds for the most important places, or to intrust their affairs generally to the wisest and most disinterested hands. At ten o'clock I left him,—for his visitors do not stay late, on account of his health,—and went to the Duchess d
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
Berkshire valleys, as much to ourselves as if there were no fashionables in New York; and, having stipulated beforehand for a separate establishment and table, we may hold out, perhaps, even after the first irruption begins. But, as soon as the Philistines are really upon us, we shall be gone; and that will no doubt be in the course of ten days. . . . Don't tell of us, but come and see; a word I utter just as if it could have any meaning in political ears. Well, I am sorry for you. As old Cooper said, you were really made for better things, and, when you are fairly turned out of office, it is within the limits of a miraculous possibility that you should find it out. Perhaps the revelation will come to you at Woods' Hole, which he of the Lamentations Hon. Jeremiah Mason. calls my Patmos, or, more euphoniously, Ticknor's Patmos. . . . . Write to me, and tell me of some glimpses of sunshine in Congress; some ground for rejoicing in the country; something that shall make a man sub