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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 27 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 22 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Andrews Norton or search for Andrews Norton in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
t was sent off immediately after the event. It contained, however, the name of the assassin, Alibaud, and the fact that he was a native of Nismes, and twenty-five years old; this being all M. d'appony had been able to cater in the first moments of the arrest. But there was a newspaper in the parcel, which the Prince sent immediately round to the Princess, and desired her to read aloud from it what was marked in pencil with red. It turned out to be Lord Melbourne's trial in the case of Mrs. Norton. She read on for a moment or two, and then casting her eye forward, said, But there are things here, Clement, that are not to be read,—Mais il y a des choses ici, Clement, qui ne se lisent pas. Well, said he, laughing, read us the end at least; let us know what the decision was; you can read that. She turned to it and read the acquittal. The Premier made no remark about it, nor did anybody else, though I knew he was very anxious to have another result; but he turned to me, and asked i
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
he education, and for the interest of the rich, who protect their property by this moral police, it is likely to be long sustained, as it is now sustained, by universal consent. But, though I do not foresee the effects, it requires no spirit of prophecy to show that they must be great; and can they be anything but good? The present effect, which I feel every day, is, that Boston is a happy place to live in, because all the people are educated, and because some of them, like Dr. Channing, Mr. Norton, and Mr. Prescott, who have grown out of this state of things, and Mr. Webster, and others, who could have been produced in no other than this state of things, are men who would be valued in any state of society in the world, and contribute materially to render its daily intercourse agreeable. . . . . . . . . Among the books republished here, and of which more copies have been sold in America than were sold of the original edition in England, is Lockhart's Life of Sir Walter, about whi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
Boston, 1847.—of which you acknowledge the receipt—has done its perfect work, and settled the question as between the two systems of prison discipline. I never knew anything of the sort so well received, or produce so considerable an effect. Mr. Norton ended a note to Gray by saying, One lays down your pamphlet without feeling the least curiosity about what may be said in reply to it, . . . . and Webster said he never expected to learn any more on the subject; it was exhausted and settled. as an elector . . . . I write to you about politics because there is nothing else hereabouts to send you, except a little orthodoxy from the village church, or a little of the polufloi/sboio qala/sshs from the beach before us. We have had Mrs. Norton and some of her children staying with us, and expect them again. Gray, too, has been here, the Everetts, Prescotts, and so on. We have not been alone since the first few days after we came down, and are not likely to be as long as we stay.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
lovely lake.—is another contrast to the rushing glories of Niagara, for the beautiful, quiet lake is always before us, and nearly every one of our pleasures is connected with it. Agreeable people, however, we have in the house, several fixtures, the same we had last year,—Dr. Beck, the author of the book on legal medicine; Dr. Campbell, the popular preacher in Albany; and two or three others, . . . . with whom we have agreeable, easy intercourse. The ruins of the old Forts, from the time of Dieskau and Montcalm, with the graves of the soldiers who perished in them and around them, are full of teachings; while at the other end of the lake is Ticonderoga, with its old ruins and traditions . . . . This week, we start for the North River, the younger portion of the party having never seen Catskill, and all of us being pleased to pass a little time at West Point, after which it is likely enough we may fetch a circuit by Newport, to see Mrs. Norton, and reach home about September
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
s. Thus, in New England, where we have learned to distinguish between our political relations to the South and our moral relations to slavery, it deepens the horror of servitude, but it does not affect a single vote . . . . . But of one thing you may be sure. It will neither benefit the slaves nor advance the slave question one iota towards its solution. . . . . You ask me about Bunsen's Hippolytus. I can hardly say I have read it. I looked over my copy, and then sent it to my kinsman, Mr. Norton, who, from having written learnedly on the Genuineness of the Gospels, would be much more interested in it than I can be. I incline, however, to Bunsen's opinion, that the tract he prints is a work of Hippolytus, though I am by no means clear about it, not half so clear as I am that the tract itself is of little importance to anybody. The rest, which is foreign to the subject, seemed to me curious,—the maxims high German, and often very little intelligible; the apology interesting to your
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
stonished to find how much has been done towards finishing it, and begin to believe, what never seemed credible to me before, that it may yet be completed. . . . . But enough of the old city; it is in the main a nasty old place. Bonn, on the contrary, is as neat as a new pin. But there, too, except one afternoon's delicious excursion up the river to the Godesberg and the Drachenfels, and a visit to the monument of Beethoven, I hardly once went out of the house. Your aunt Catherine, Mrs. Norton returning from Italy. and the girls, and Charles were enough; but besides these, I had my old kind friend, Professor Welcker, every day, Pauli,—a very active, spirited young man who was secretary to Bunsen,—and Professor Gerhard, the last day, who was among those Lady Lyell wrote Anna she had seen at Berlin, and hoped we should see there, little thinking that he was an old acquaintance, and was coming right to us at Bonn. Here it is much the same sort of thing. Dr. Pauli told me of an
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
. . . . He is looking very well, and says he is better than he has been for many years . . . . . He is to come again to-morrow morning, and I shall go with him to Lady Head, and he with me afterwards to the British Museum . I went to the Duchess of Argyll's party . . . . . There were a good many people there whom I knew, more than I expected, and I had a very good time. The Lyells, Lord Burlington,—who is to be Duke of Devonshire, and is fit to be,—Stirling, Lord and Lady Wensleydale, Mrs. Norton, and I suppose a dozen more. July 9.—We had a most delightful breakfast at Twisleton's this morning: Tocqueville, Sir Edmund Head, Senior, Stirling, Lord Glenelg, Lord Monteagle, Merivale,--again, and I was glad of it,—Sir George Lewis, and Lord Lansdowne,—a little older than he was last year. The talk was admirable, and I was struck anew with the abundance of Lewis's knowledge; but I have not time to tell you, and only see how many pages I have written. I went home with Head, and
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
gin, Countess of, II. 126. Elgin, Seventh Earl of, I. 279. Eliot, Miss, Anna, I. 334 and note, 335. See Ticknor, Mrs. George. Eliot, Miss, Catherine. See Norton, Mrs. Andrews. Eliot, Mrs., Samuel, letter to, I. 337. Eliot, Samuel Atkins, II. 250, 260 note; letters to, I. 331, 340. Eliot, Samuel, founder of Greekdier, Madame C., II. 123. Noel, R. R., I. 506. Norman, Mr., 11. 390. Northampton, Marquis of, it. 176. Norton, Charles Eliot, II. 328, 491 note. Norton, Mrs., Andrews, I. 334 note, 398 note, 11.282, 328. Norton, Professor, Andrews, 1.17, 319, 334, 355, 356, 11.188, 229, 287. Nostitz, General, II. 332. O O'ConneNorton, Professor, Andrews, 1.17, 319, 334, 355, 356, 11.188, 229, 287. Nostitz, General, II. 332. O O'Connell, Daniel, I. 411, 416, 480. Odescalchi. Cardinal, II. 85. Odillon-Barrot, II. 136. Oehlenschlager, Adam, I. 126. Ogilvie, James, 1.8. Oken, Professor, I. 115- Ole Bull, it. 225. Oliver, Robert, I 41. O'Neil, Miss, 1. 53. Ord, Mr., T. 415. Orleans, Due da T. 493, II. 122. Orleans, Helene, Duchesse d% II. 121,