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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 26 0 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
true, he replied; you will go on much further in democracy; you will become much more democratic. I do not know where it will end, nor how it will end; but it cannot end in a quiet, ripe old age. He asked me who will be our next President. I told him that it will be Van Buren; and that, as I do not desire it, he might consider my opinion at least unprejudiced. He answered, Neither should I be of Mr. Van Buren's party, if I were in America I should rather be of that old party of which Washington was originally the head. It was a sort of conservative party, and I should be conservative almost everywhere, certainly in England and America. Your country is a very important one. This government is about to establish regular diplomatic relations with it. You have always managed your affairs with foreign nations with ability. I do not remember what followed with sufficient distinctness to repeat it; but after talking a little about Austria, and praising the late Emperor very much,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
nder Louis Philippe, to whom he is now Conseiller d'etat. Among other things he told me that Tom Paine, who lived in Monroe's house at Paris, had a great deal too much influence over Monroe; that Monroe's insinuations and representations of General Pinckney's character, as an aristocrat, prevented his reception as Minister by the Directory, and that, in general, Monroe, with whose negotiations and affairs Pichon was specially charged, acted as a party-democrat against the interests of General Washington's administration, and against what Pichon considered the interests of the United States. Of Burr, he said that he was the most unprincipled man he had almost ever known, and that he hardly knew how he could have become so, to such a degree, in the United States. He said that between 1801 and 1805, while Burr was Vice-President of the United States, he made suggestions and proposals to Pichon, for throwing the United States into confusion, and separating the States under the influence
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
with least variation from the principles of its founders. He belonged to a generation which began life while yet the discussions connected with the first creation of the United States government were fresh in men's minds; when the opinions of Washington, Hamilton, and Adams were familiarly known; and he lived through a period when the progress of the nation was remarkably rapid, well-balanced in material, moral, and intellectual growth, and guided by men of worth as well as of ability. As hishe Madawaska, and when will you get pay for your frolic last winter? However, laissez-aller. It is a new year. Love to all. Yours always, G. T. To Charles S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, May 12, 1840. Guizot's essay on the character of Washington is admirable, and Hillard has done justice to it in the translation. As soon as it is out I pray you to read it, and cause it to be read in your purlieus. It is a salutary document, and as beautiful as it is salutary; full of statesmanlike w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
d Letters of Romilly, p. 142. for I have had two letters—the second a sort of postscript to the first from Lord Mahon about the Andre matter. . . . . Lord Mahon cited to me an opinion of Guizot's, given him lately in conversation at Paris, that Washington should not have permitted Andre to be hanged; to which I gave him your reference to Romilly, as a Roland for his Oliver. He is in trouble, too, about a passage in his last volume concerning the Buff and Blue—Mrs. Crewe, true blue—as the Fox colors, which he intimates, you know, to have been taken in compliment to Washington. But, besides that,—as I think,—the Whigs would have been reproached for this assumption of traitor colors in a way that would not now be forgotten; these colors were fashionable earlier. You will find a curious proof of this in Goethe's autobiography,--Dichtung und Wahrheit, Book XII:,—where, speaking of the young Jerusalem as the chief prototype of his Werther, he says that he wore a blue coat, and buff
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
usion, he went home feeling as if he had nothing more to do so far as this, in his view the most important, part of the institution was concerned. Troubles there were still, but of other kinds; and, although he was a trifle disappointed by the result of an experiment he tried in 1860, to test the popular disposition for reading useful books, He gave the Library fifty copies of Miss Nightingale's Notes on Nursing; twenty copies of Smiles's Self Help; twenty copies of Everett's Life of Washington; ten copies of the Life of Amos Lawrence, a merchant of Boston; twelve copies of the Teacher's Assistant, and some others. For a time many of these kept well in circulation, especially Miss Nightingale's excellent little book; but at the end of six months the demand for them had substantially ceased. he did not lose faith in his theory that, the taste for reading once formed, the standard of that taste would rise. He would have rejoiced in the absolute proof produced, since 1873, of the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
rds to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebody with whom you are so well acquainted that you will know how to measure what he says. . . . . All men, I think, are satisfied that our principles of government are about to be put to the test as they never yet have been. The sectional parties, that Washington and Hamilton foresaw as our greatest danger, and which Calhoun, Clay, Webster, and J. Q. Adams died believing they would break up the Union, are now fully formed. . . . From the time of Calhoun, or from the announcement of his dangerous and unsound doctrines, that is, from 1828, to 1832, the people of South Carolina have been gradually coming to the conclusion that it is not for their material interest to continue in the Union. Nearly all have now come to this persuasion. The passages
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
ote, 332, 358, 359, 365. Pertz, Mrs., II. 359, 365. Peter, America Pinkney, T. 38; Britannia Wellington, 38; Columbia Washington, 38; Thomas, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peters, of Merton, II. 168. Petrarch, letter on, I. 341-344. qualities, 3 and note; importer of Merino sheep, 3 note; marriage, 4; G. T.'s account of, 6, 7; feeling at the death of Washington, 21, confidence between him and his son, 22; letters to, 27, 28, 29, 31, 73 and note, 74, 79, 81, 84, 95, 99, 102, 116,., Professor in Harvard College, I. 355, 356. Warren, Dr. J. C, I. 10, 12. Warren, Dr. J. C., 2d., I. 10. Washington, General, death of, I. 21; modes of life, 38; Talleyrand's feeling towards, 261 and note. Washington, Judge, I. 38. WasWashington, Judge, I. 38. Washington, visits, I. 26, 38, 346, 349, 380-382, II. 263. Waterloo, battle of, I. 60, 62, 64, 65. Waterloo, visits, I. 452, 453. Waterton, Charles, I. 439. Watertown, I. 385. Watts of the British Museum, II. 359, 360, 375. Watzdorff, G