Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Hays or search for Hays in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
evidently intended to lead the men in the charge, so imminent was the peril to the army. Gordon remonstrated, the men cried Lee to the rear, and one of them seizing the General's bridle, led his horse back, while the charge was made with fury, and the Federals were driven back to the base of the Bloody Angle, where the fight continued with unparalleled fury during the day. On May 14, 1864, Gordon was promoted major-general and put in command of a division composed of Evans' Georgia brigade, Hays' and Stafford's Louisiana brigades, and Terry's Virginia brigade, made up of the remnants of the Stonewall brigade and others. With this command he joined Breckinridge and Early, after the battle of Cold Harbor, in the repulse of Hunter, moved to Harper's Ferry, attacked Maryland Heights, and at Monocacy led the attack on the right which routed Lew Wallace. After this campaign closed before the defenses of Washington, Gordon had a prominent part in the fighting in the Shenandoah valley unde