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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 4 document sections:

rospects. Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, the gallant organizer and leader of the Maryland Line, distinguished in many of the battles of the army of Virginia, one of the most brilliant regimental and brigade commanders under Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee, and for a time in command of division, is the author of the military history of Maryland, a subject which he is eminently qualified to handle. With a facile pen he has traced the history of his State, in so far as it was involved in the Cost work of the lamented Major Jed Hotchkiss, of Staunton, Va., was the completion of his history of Virginia. Very soon after he laid down the pen with which he traced the record of the war in Virginia, and of the great army which was led by Robert E. Lee, he was called to the rest of the soldier and Christian. As topographer and staff officer under Garnett, Lee, Jackson, Ewell and Early, he was undoubtedly more familiar with the battlefields of Virginia than any other man, and it is fortunat
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
committee on the cessions of New York, Virginia and Connecticut, and the petitions of the Indiana, Vandalia, Illinois and Wabash companies, being called for by the delegates for Virginia, and the first paragraph being read, a motion was made by Mr. Lee, seconded by Mr. Bland [both Virginia delegates], That previous to any determination in Congress, relative to the cessions of the western lands, the name of each member present be called over by the secretary; that on such call, each member do den referred the motion of Mr. Bland, to accept the cession of Virginia. This committee recommended that Congress should take up the old report of November 3, 1781, which had slumbered on the journals since the effective narcotic administered by Mr. Lee. Whereupon Congress ordered: That so much thereof as relates to the cession made by the Commonwealth of Virginia, on the 2d day of January, 1781, be referred to a committee of five members. This committee reported June 20, 1783, recommending
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
es and the insurgents. Thus at the moment when Lee had been repulsed at Gettysburg and was now recd rations which were very greatly needed by General Lee, and their equivalents from Johnson's Islanhe time of Grant's final and successful assault Lee had in his line of thirty-five miles only about's total on the morning of his final assault on Lee's lines was 124,700 present for duty, equipped f battle each the equal of one under command of Lee. He was enabled thereby to cover Lee's entire fo a frazzle was the graphic word Gordon sent to Lee, only a few hours before actual surrender, whicsecretary of war to have no conference with General Lee unless for the capitulation of his army or r was probably given because of the report that Lee was seeking a conference with Grant to arrange undance whatever the armies of Grant required. Lee had well matured plans both for meeting battle e no more. Only a few days later Grant broke Lee's lines, forcing his retreat and causing the re[7 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
ife. The defeat and surrender of the armies of Lee and Johnston dissolved the Confederate States iucted in France. Robert Edward Lee Robert Edward Lee, general-in-chief of the Confederate Sta become a part of their country's glory. General Lee's lineage and collateral kindred constitutehis name and revered his memory. Contrast of Lee with other men will not be instituted, because historian shall come to survey the character of Lee he will find it rising like a huge mountain abo the cold recital which is here attempted. General Lee was born at Stratford, Virginia, January 19 am compelled to make special mention of Captain R. E. Lee, and the brevet as major was accorded tho the skill, valor and undaunted energy of Robert E. Lee. Jefferson Davis, in a public address at ke the selection, viz: Joseph E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston and Charles F. Smif his own and A. P. Hill's division, under Robert E. Lee, in the successful battles of Gaines' Mill[7 more...]