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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 218 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 115 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 81 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 65 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Kirby Smith or search for Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
tender the temporary possession if he should not receive speedy relief from Spain. The letter of Mr. J. P. Morier, the British charge d'affaires, written December 15, 1810, was a protest against the occupation by the United States on the part of Great Britain, as the friend of Spain, and was somewhat threatening in tone. Upon receipt of the President's communication the matter was referred to a committee consisting of Senators Clay, of Kentucky; Crawford, of Georgia; Bradley, of Vermont; Smith, of Maryland, and Anderson, of Tennessee (Annals of Congress, 1810-1811, pp. 370-76), and on January 7th, Mr. Clay, from this committee, reported a declaration and bill to enable the President to take possession of East Florida, which passed the Senate in secret session January 10, 1811, by a vote of 23 to 7. The nays were Senators Bayard, of Delaware; Champlin, of Rhode Island; Goodrich, of New Hampshire; Horsey, of Delaware; Lloyd, of Massachusetts; Pickering, of Massachusetts, and Reed,
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
e Southern side showed the army of Lee sustaining every assault and so far able to maintain the defense of Richmond against great odds as to permit the dispatching of Early and Breckinridge to drive Hunter from Lynchburg and to march to the Potomac where the Fourth of July found them ready to cross for the purpose of attacking Washington. Johnston had preserved his army and was crossing the Chattahoochee to defend Atlanta, at which point a concentration of State troops was contemplated. Kirby Smith, Taylor, Stephen D. Lee and Forrest were still in position to protect the West and even to advance northward if Sherman should be checked. The Confederacy was not yet exhausted and popular faith in success had not died out. The two great antagonists were thus confronted in July, 1864, with the possibilities of devastation, death and suffering such as only a civil war can cause, all of which were unhappily realized by the neglect of this opportunity to secure peace. Even the political
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
des Johnston and Lee, Hardee, Thomas, VanDorn, Fitz Lee, Kirby Smith, and Stoneman, later distinguished in the Confederate waMississippi river and Atlanta, except the command of General Kirby Smith, in East Tennessee. He planned a campaign into Kentut on his northward movement about the middle of August, Kirby Smith moving with a separate command in co-operation. At Munfn moved his army to Bardstown, and with his staff joined Kirby Smith at Lexington, where on October 4th, Hon. Richard Hawes w of the new department of the West, including the forces of Smith, Bragg and Pemberton. On December 30th-31st he repulsed thghty river until he learned of the surrender by General Kirby Smith. After that he rode into Natchez May 31, 1865, surrendef Arkansas and West Louisiana. As chief of staff of General Kirby Smith he negotiated the surrender of his department, afterle body known as Forrest's Cavalry. In February, 1864, General Smith with seven thousand mounted men was sent against him in