hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 190 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 93 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 42 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 38 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 8 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Washington, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Alexander Dimitry, and since his boyhood has been identified with Louisiana. Returning in 1861 from Central America, where he acted as secretary to his father, United States minister, he enlisted in the famous Crescent regiment of New Orleans, and going into battle at Shiloh received a severe and disabling wound. Subsequently he became chief clerk of the postoffice department at Richmond under Postmaster-General Reagan. He accompanied the presidential party in April, 1865, as far as Washington, Ga. On his return to Louisiana he wrote the famous epitaph for Albert Sidney Johnston, which is now carved upon the tomb erected by the association of the Army of Tennessee, at New Orleans. Gov. Orin M. Roberts, author of the Texas history, is another who, since the completion of his work, has passed to the reward of an honorable life. He was a native of South Carolina, a descendant of Revolutionary ancestors, a graduate of the university of Alabama, and in 1840 a settler in Texas. As
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
Ohio. On the question of admitting negroes to the right of suffrage the vote stood 17 ayes, 17 nays. (Life of Nathaniel Massie, p. 87.) This convention was controlled by men from the slave-holding States of Kentucky and Tennessee, yet we find them badly divided on this question—one of their own leaders, Charles Willing Byrd, a Virginian of the Virginians, standing steadily for the right of the negro to vote. On the other hand, Messrs. Huntington, of Trimble county, and McIntosh, of Washington county, scions of New England stock, were with Massie and Worthington against negro suffrage. Thomas Worthington, although opposed to negro suffrage, had emancipated his slaves on leaving Virginia. The following quotation from an author of accuracy and ability shows that the slavery question had not taken a form entirely sectional even as late as 1824: One thing is remarkable; East Tennessee had an abolition paper nine or ten years before the advent of Garrison's paper. As early as 1
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
onstitution of the Confederate States still evidenced the compact by which the States had confederated. The State governments under that Constitution were still operating except where they were obstructed by military authority. Jefferson Davis was still President and commander-in-chief. His cabinet in part, as far as he required, were with him, and a small military body was detailed to escort him. Thus he passed through South Carolina into Georgia, held his last cabinet council in Washington, Georgia, and then, anxious for the safety of his family, pushed on westward designing to cross the Mississippi river. While thus seeking to reach the western Confederacy Mr. Davis was captured, imprisoned, bound in chains and closely guarded. In the meantime a most deplorable event happened in the unexpected assassination of President Lincoln, concerning which it may be earnestly said that all verbal resentment of that crime was paralyzed by the inexpressible horror of it. The shame of it
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
ating Wallace at Monocacy. Subsequently he fought in the valley until given command in Southwest Virginia, whence he was called to the cabinet. On the collapse of the government he escaped to Cuba, and visited Canada and Europe before returning home. He then became vice-president of the Lexington and Big Sandy railroad. His death occurred May 17, 1875, at Lexington. John Archibald Campbell John Archibald Campbell, assistant secretary of war, was a Georgian by his birth in Washington, Wilkes county, in that State, June 24, 1811. His grandfather served on the staff of Major-General Greene during the revolution, and his father, Duncan G. Campbell, was a distinguished lawyer, and otherwise prominent in the-public affairs of the State. The education of Judge Campbell was obtained through the schools of his State, and in the university of Georgia, where he was graduated in 1826 with the first honors. He also had two years as a cadet at West Point, but resigned that position on