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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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be allotted, an account of the gallant deeds of the navy. He entered the service of the Confederate States after twenty years connection with the old United States navy, during which he had participated in the war with Mexico, and sailed upon the first cruise, in the Pacific, of the Merrimac. His gallant performance of duty on the North Carolina coast early in 1862, was followed by memorable service in the famous battle of the ironclads in Hampton Roads, and on the Palmetto State in Charleston harbor. Subsequently he organized and was superintendent of the Confederate States naval academy until the close of hostilities. In the course of his subsequent career he served as president of the Maryland agricultural college, and as minister of the United States to Corea during the first administration of President Cleveland. The morale of the Confederate armies, a chapter demonstrating the high character of the Confederate soldier, his unflinching endurance of hardship, unyielding al
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ed as if no discontent prevailed, and in the meantime Mr. Floyd, secretary of war, ordered Col. Porter, November 6th, to inspect troops and fortifications in Charleston Harbor, who made the inspection and returned a full report on the following week. The work on the several forts was increased through the energies of Captain Foste reinforcement secretly by the strategy of designating in public orders the expedition for other duty, but in reality to relieve and strengthen the forts in Charleston Harbor. Captain Foster advised that in case the department does not consider it expedient to send troops there should be a corps of employes armed to be effective aerward, December 12th, resigned the portfolio of state on account of his disagreement with the administration on the question of reinforcement of Anderson at Charleston Harbor, and Attorney-General Black assumed his place. Mr. Stanton enters the cabinet as attorney-general. Public discussions take place in many Southern States an
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
parties together, to avert war, to stay the progress of secession, and to reunite the seceded States with the Union, he sought Mr. Seward and obtained from him such intimations concerning the policy of the new administration as to induce him to persuade the commissioners to trust the government fully. But at the time he was pledging this assurance, the administration was organizing the coercion movement which was precipitated by the descent of reinforcement vessels upon the waters in Charleston harbor. His indignation at being trifled with by Mr. Seward caused him to forward to the secretary the able historic exposure which now belongs to the history of the inauguration of the war. President Lincoln's immediate call for a large army to invade the South was sufficient confirmation to his mind that he and the South had been dealt with deceitfully by the secretary of state, and that only war could ensue. He therefore resigned his seat on the Supreme bench and on coming home was as